Squeaky Bone Relay race

The Squeaky Bone Relay is an event really well attended by members of my running club every year.

Hosted by Olney Runners, the event is a four-person off-road relay with each legs of either 3.5 or 2.3miles and usually falls in October, having always clashed with other things in my calendar, so I’ve never been able to attend before.

This year though for whatever reason, the race fell at the end of September and I was so excited to be running on a team with Tom, Steph and Laura.

Squeaky Bone relay race

It was my first hard run back after running the Robin Hood 100 two weeks earlier, and only my fourth run since I’d finished the ultra.  I wasn’t too hopeful of winning any prizes and made sure the others weren’t expecting miracles too!

Although I was the Team Captain for our group, having signed us up for the 3.5 mile option online, I hadn’t realised the order I put us onto the system when signing up was the order we would be required to run in on the day, otherwise I would never have put myself first!  The running order went Me, Tom, Steph and then Laura last.  At least my leg would be over and done with and then I would be able to enjoy a hot drink when I finished while I waited for the others to run their section!

We arrived fairly early in order to collect our race numbers and baton, complete with squeaky dog toy attached!  It was rather chilly hanging around in the shade at the start, although I was glad that I’d chosen to wear a t-shirt when we did begin running as the sun out on the course made it really warm out there.

We started with a bang, and my first mile came in at 8m 47s.  The elevation was fairly flat for the majority of the course, with just a small rutted section at the beginning alongside the car parking area.  The route was a nice one though – around the edges of fields and through a small wood.  Other than that first small section, the rest of the ground was fairly solid without any uneven bits which made for easy going.

My second mile remained under 9mm pace, but I started to slow down after that.  Although physically I seemed to have recovered from the ultra I had found during my runs since that my body wouldn’t maintain the same pace for as long as it had been doing prior to running the 100 and I would tire as a run went on.

At the end of each leg, the course ran onto the edge of the field where the handover took place and up to the top of the field before turning, running underneath the finish gantry and towards the next member of your team for handover.  I did have a small panic when I couldn’t spot Tom on my approach but as I crossed the line ready for handover, he seemed to step across from nowhere to grab the baton (with squeaky bone attached!) from me and continue the relay for leg number two.

Squeaky Bone relay race

(Photo shared on the Squeaky Bone Relay Facebook page).

We were the Wellingborough Warriors and ended up coming 65th out of 122 teams running the 3.5 mile distance.  (Which we all clocked at around 3.6 miles(!) )

Our splits were as follows:
Me – 33m 18s (65th pos)
Tom – 30m 13s (66th pos)
Steph – 29m 41s (59th pos)
Laura – 30m 42s (65th pos)

Which gave us a total time of 2h 3m 54s.  We’d estimated that we would probably take about 2 hours to complete the event, so we weren’t far off our estimation!

Squeaky Bone relay race

I really enjoyed the atmosphere of the event and will definitely be looking to give it another go again next year!

Have you run any relay events before?

The London Marathon ballot reveal

This week the ballot results for the 2019 Virgin Money London Marathon (VMLM) have been announced.  Unlucky ballot entrants receive either a rejection magazine…

London Marathon rejection magazine 2018(Here’s mine from last year)

…or a rejection email.  (Becoming more and more likely with the higher numbers of hopeful people applying for a place each year.)

Personally, I received my eighth marathon rejection earlier today, which wasn’t too much of a shock.  Apparently 414,168 people applied for the ballot this year.  The race only has approximately 35,000ish finishers, and that includes elites, championship/GFA entries and those running for charity.  That’s a whole lot of people that are going to end up disappointed this week!

Whilst I know so, so many people will have been disappointed over the past couple of days when they received their rejection message, it is rather frustrating to see many turn to social media to complain about the ballot being an unfair system.

In fact, surely the opposite is true?

Everybody that enters for a place in the London Marathon through the public ballot has an equal shot at being selected for one of the places on offer.

Yeah it might be rather sucky that this is your ninth rejection (No more than nine rejections are possible!), but it’s also probably pretty sucky that you haven’t won the lottery in the past nine years either!

If you don’t win the lottery but are still desperate to become a millionaire, then there is the option to go out and work hard to make it happen.  The same applies when it comes to wanting to run the London Marathon.  If you are desperate to run the event, there are other ways to gain a place.

Applying for a charity place

London Marathon is known for the hoards of charity runners who line the street on race day.  In fact, the official VMLM website states that accounting for everything that was fundraised using their online Virgin Money Giving system for the 2018 race, £24,593,020.00 has been raised to date!
Often, charity places open for applications not long after the main ballot opens.  Some of the more well known charities will not be able to guarantee you a place though and will be asking questions such as how much money you are hoping to raise for them and reasons why you want to run for their charity.  If you are not too choosy about the charity you want to run for though, you will usually still be able to secure a charity marathon place a couple of months out from race day.
Charities tend to ask that you raise a minimum of £1500, with most asking for £2000 or more.  Although this can sound like a lot of money, the charity themselves has to fork out £300 for your entry and as long as you begin fundraising early on and don’t leave it all to the last minute raising the money is probably more of an achievable target than you initially thought.  In fact, if by now, you already know that you are running for a charity, you still have a good couple of months before the main bulk of marathon training needs to begin and you should be able to hopefully put most of your focus into fundraising, and then later on into the training, rather than having to try and juggle everything all at once in the weeks leading up to race day.

Good For Age (GFA)/Championship qualified

The Good For Age requirements have changed from the 2019 race, which you can read about in my blog post here.  If you have run a time deemed as ‘good’ for your age at a previous marathon event as listed by the team at VMLM then you will be offered a place in the race the following year.  Although this used to be a guaranteed way to gain entry to the marathon, this is no longer the case.  There are now a maximum of 3,000 female GFA spots and 3,000 male GFA spots available for the 2019 event.  If more than 6,000 runners applied for a GFA position, then ‘the qualifying time will be reduced evenly across the age group categories listed above until 3,000 runners of that gender are accepted’.  Meaning that you may have worked super hard to achieve a 3:44 qualifying marathon time as a senior female runner, only for the goalposts to be moved after you have submitted your entry, due to high numbers of other runners also applying for a place and you may not actually end up with a race place at all.
It’s too late to enter the 2019 event using this method as places needed to be applied for at the start of the Summer, but it could be something to work towards ready for the 2020 race.  For many people though, it may be necessary to put a lot more time, hard work and dedication into their training in order to achieve the stated times.

Club places

All England Athletic clubs offer a number of VMLM places to their members (dependent upon the size of the club.  The majority of clubs then host their own ballot to determine who runs to represent their club at the marathon the following April.  Clubs may have their own prerequisites when it comes to entering.  For example, to enter the VMLM club ballot for one of two places as held by my running club you have to provide your rejection email/magazine from the main ballot.  You can then gain further entries into the club ballot if you marshaled the club race that Summer or ran a certain number of club-targeted races throughout the year.  I have only run the London marathon once before, in 2014 and this was the way in which I gained my place.

Competitions

This option requires the least work but the most luck!  There are always lots of competitions offering marathon places in the weeks and months following the ballot results.  Keep an eye on the official London Marathon social media accounts and also any of their official sponsors, as they often post about last minute marathon places up for grabs!

VLM marathon number collection

It hasn’t been very nice to read some nasty comments today on social media about runners who ‘shouldn’t get a place’ as they’ve already run the race or ‘aren’t fast enough to be classed as a runner’.  I’ve seen lots of comments about people criticising current non-runners for entering the ballot and then gaining a place, even though once upon a time they themselves would have been non-runners and potentially in the same situation.  Everybody who enters the ballot knows how incredibly slim the chances of getting a place are.  Don’t make others scared to announce their good fortune because of your jealousy!

London Marathon is what it is.  It’s an incredibly iconic and well supported event, but it’s not a fast course due to the sheer volume of runners out there and it can actually be rather stressful feeling so boxed in along many areas of the course.  I’ve run the race before and I did really enjoy it, but there are so many fantastic other marathons to try out as well!

I wanted to raise money for Cancer Research this year following the death of my Mum , Aunts, Godmother and cousins of my Dad.  We’ve had a lot of cancer related death in our family since the end of last November and I want to help work towards preventing cancer in the future, albeit in a very small way through raising much needed funds.  I applied for a London Marathon place through Cancer Research several months ago now and after initially hearing that I hadn’t been successful, I received an email a fortnight ago offering me a place.

I’m really excited to say that I will be running at London in 2019 and more importantly, raising money for a cause that means a lot to me and my family right now.  I’m really looking forward to being part of the Cancer Research team on the day and in the build up to the day.  There are a couple of large events which I have in mind to hopefully make up the bulk of my fundraising.  (I’m hoping to raise a minimum of £3000) and I’ll share them on the blog when I have more details.

Good luck to all runners preparing for the 2019 event, first timers and 6-time-lucky-ballot-enterers alike!

Do you have a place for London 2019?  Did you enter the ballot this year?
Have you run the race before?
Any successful fundraising suggestions you can share with me?

I ran 100 miles! (Part 3)

(You can find the first two parts of my Robin Hood 100 mile recap here… Part one * Part two)

Knowing that I had arrived at mile 84.28 (every point 2-8 counted after 24 hours of running!) was a nice boost.

Seeing Dan and Oscar and knowing that they would be following me round the course until the end now was nice to know, and by now I had heard word that Kev and Amanda who had run 50 miles at the Centurion Chiltern Wonderland race (160 miles South!) on Saturday were at the finish line, grabbing a quick sleep before coming out on the course to see me finish.

Hitting the canal path on the return leg of the route was hard going.  I’d forgotten how rough the terrain had been.  Tufts of grass sticking up everywhere and really uneven ground underneath on such a narrow path at times.  I was glad that I wasn’t one of the faster runners who would have had to complete this section at nighttime in the dark.  Although it was bad enough running it after 12 minutes sleep in the past 26 hours or so.  I felt rather bad for Guy here as so much of this section I had to walk.  My feet were in tatters by now.  The small stones I had accumulated in my trainers earlier on had rubbed slightly and the bottoms of my feet were very tender.  Every footfall that wasn’t on flat ground was agony and at times I couldn’t stop a whimper from sneaking out of my mouth.

We had a brief panic as we headed up over a bridge that crossed the road and could no longer see reflective tape marking the way back down and along the canal the other side.  I knew that I had come following the canal, and was sure that the route followed the path in reverse until we nearly reached the finish, but I doubted myself on such little sleep.  Guy jogged up the road to see if he could see any tape in either direction but there was none, so nervously we agreed to follow the canal path in reverse of the way I had run out.  I texted Gary to see if he could check on the tracker that we were still on course and after a few minutes, he confirmed that we were.  A kilometre or so up the track we came across some reflective tape and I could relax again!

When I had last seen Gary and Dan they had both told me that they would be at the next checkpoint.  They both misspoke.  For a good two miles before the aid station I was eagerly coming round every turn expecting to see Gary with pasta pot in hand and Oscar running up to me.  What felt like hours later Guy and I turned the corner to come across the checkpoint, only for nobody to be there waiting for us.  I slumped down into a deckchair shouting really dejectedly “Gary! Gary! Where are you?!”  Apparently one of the marshals at the checkpoint was called Gary, but he wasn’t the Gary I was after!  Another volunteer told me that he hadn’t seen my toddler at this checkpoint…my crew weren’t here.  I spent a good minute or so feeling sorry for myself before shovelling in some ready salted crisps and announcing to Guy that we had to get going again.  I needed to find where Gary and my pasta were…I wasn’t stopping!  Afterwards we worked out my crew had meant to say that they would be at the next CREW station, not checkpoint.  This checkpoint was one of two where crews could not attend due to the lack of parking in the surrounding area.

We traipsed on and a brief glimmer of hope began to grow as I remembered that I had seen Helen, Grant and Val somewhere near to this point on the way out at the start of the race.  Perhaps everybody would be at this point on the return instead?  The race course is twenty miles out, two thirty mile loops and then twenty miles back again to the start/finish, so each section of the course is run twice which is reassuring as you cover the same paths twice.  Although, on that towpath I swear every turn looked the same!

Eventually, at 93 miles I heard shouts of my name and I looked to see Kev and Dan with Oscar all shouting at me in the distance.  That got me to pick up my pace and as I got closer I also spotted Amanda.  Kev hurriedly rushed off to heat up a Pot Noodle for me, which I demolished, absolutely starving by now!  Gary had set off for home, as his son had a football match later that afternoon, but he had passed over my bag to Kev and Amanda who were going to crew me for the final ten miles of the race.

The Pot Noodle went down easily, although I decided I needed to get moving again so took the remainder with me as I headed off in the direction of the finish along the towpath.  Seeing everybody here had given me the big boost I needed to get going and after dropping my empty Pot Noodle cup in a nearby bin and passing my fork to Guy I managed to get some more running in again in short bursts.

The last aid station and crew point was at 97 miles and those four miles went on for what felt like forever.  The sun had really picked up by now and I was regretting not packing my running cap – feeling the sun burning down on the top of my head.  With nearly a mile still to go to the aid station, Amanda came walking along back along the path declaring that there were only three bridges left for me to walk under before coming across the checkpoint.  I really needed to get another sleep by now.  All I could think about was sleeping.  Although Amanda was carrying a plastic pint cup and when she mentioned that her and Kev had been waiting in the pub for me to arrive, my thoughts changed to what lovely beer garden weather it was that day and how much I would like a nice cool cider…why hadn’t they brought me a cider?!

Turns out Amanda lied (although she swears she just miscounted!) but there were actually four bridges.  I may have had a minor melt down when I realised that the third bridge I counted wasn’t in fact where the aid station was!  Finally though we did arrive and I ran over to Kev to say I really needed to sleep in his van for just 10 minutes.  Kev took me by the shoulders and very matter-of-fact told me that I could sleep for five minutes – no longer – on the floor of the aid station.  Then they would be moving me on.  I agreed and quickly clambered down onto the floor for a brief sleep.  The last thing I remember was the heat of the sun on my bare legs sticking out from under the aid tent and worrying that I had no suncream on them!

I don’t remember anybody waking me, but I do remember leaving the checkpoint and checking repeatedly with the marshal that it was no more than three miles now until the finish.  (Another lie which I was told!)

We had a steepish climb up from this checkpoint but I knew the finish would soon be in sight now.  With just over an hour to go I knew all I had to do was to keep moving until the end and I would finish it.  In the bag!

My watch battery had grown low around mile 60 the night before.  Following the battery death of my watch at the South Downs Way in June I had been told that I could continue to run whilst charging my watch from a battery pack, so had come prepared this time.  On leaving the aid station at mile 62 I had attached the battery pack to my watch and hooked this into my bag.  I realised after about a mile that the display on my watch was now blank though.  Had the battery died completely?  James had suggested turning it on again and my watch flashed something on the display and beeped.  I realised later though, that by pressing the on/off button I had actually been turning my watch OFF and stopping the recording annoyingly!  I removed the battery pack at mile 77 and turned the now fully-charged watch back on to record the final section of my race, but have no watch data from those middle miles unfortunately.

As my watch now showed mileage that was really out with how many miles I had actually run I made a mental note of the mileage it showed as I left the final checkpoint the moment the marshal confirmed with me for the second time that it was no further than three miles until the end.  Perfect.  Three miles.  I can cover three miles in that time.  Easy!

Guy and I passed two runners sat on the floor at mile 98.  Guy had a few words and reported back to me that they had decided to pull at mile 98 of the race.  How gutted would you be?!  Things must be bad though if there isn’t enough in you to walk the final two miles of a 100 mile race.

We crossed back over the horrible, horrible ploughed field.  It thought it was bad at mile 5…it was a million times worse at mile 98.  I couldn’t stop the whimpers of pain escaping with almost every footfall now.  My feet were so sore and every time they fell on the really uneven ground I was in agony!

Finally we made it out on the other side though and it wasn’t long before in the far, far distance I could see the building which I was sure we had come from!  The end was in sight!  Only, my watch said that there was only a mile to go.  That building was still much further than a mile away.  I suddenly began to panic.  Time was ticking down to the finish and I realised that the ‘three miles to the finish’ had been incorrect.  It was clearly further.  I started to pick the pace up again, panic creeping into my voice as I told Guy ‘We have to make it to the finish.  I can’t finish in over 30 hours.  I can’t run the distance and not be given a time because I didn’t make cut-off!’  I began to jog.  I could see Kev and Amanda again.  They had run back along the course to meet me.  Were they running to me because I was going to miss the cut-off?  My jog turned into a run, momentarily forgetting about the pain in my feet and allowing me to pass a number of other runners who had all been reduced to a walk for the final few miles.  Kev told me that I needed to run.  Not to panic, but to carry on running.  They wouldn’t let me miss the cut-off.  I would get there in time.  It was so hard not to look at my watch, although I knew it wouldn’t do any good.  The numbers made no sense anymore anyway.  I had no idea how many miles I’d run now or how far there was to go.  Kev’s declaration that it wasn’t far meant nothing and to tell the truth I didn’t trust anyone by this point now anyway!

I ran and ran and ran.  A few cries came from my mouth when I hit particularly hard stones with my now very-blistered feet but I was getting to that finish!  As I ran down into the village hall car park I couldn’t spot a finisher gantry and realised that I had no idea where I needed to go!  I shouted to Kev who told me that I needed to run inside the building.  I threw a wave to Dan who was getting Oscar out of the car, and to John and Lynn who stood near the entrance to the building and pushed on through the doorway.  Now where?!  It wasn’t obvious!  Somebody shouted that I needed to run through the door to the right and so I continued, bursting into a small room to instant applause.  I could see rows of chairs around the room where those who had finished before me now sat, drinking hot drinks and relaxing with family.  Somebody appeared from nowhere to hand me my finisher t-shirt, engraved medal (such a nice touch!) and to pass Dan a bottle of beer.

100 mile Hobo Pace Robin Hood 100 medal

They asked if I would like a hot drink and I started to make my way to a seat, although for some reason I no longer had the urge to sit down.  More runners burst into the room and I joined everyone in clapping.  It was several minutes later before a woman came up and asked if I had handed in my timing chip and given my name to a guy with a board.  I hadn’t and hadn’t realised I needed to do so, so I think my official time is probably a few minutes out.  The provisional results show that I finished at the same time as two other runners (which I didn’t) in 77th place with 29:48:11 for my time.  I would imagine that my time was actually closer to 29:45, but what is three minutes when I know that I made it before cut-off?!  And besides, it will just make it easier to beat my time when it comes to running my next 100 mile race, right?!  😉

100 mile finisher face! (Robin Hood 100)

113 runners started the race, and 79 runners made the finish within cut-off, with a further two runners completing the distance 52 minutes past the 30 allowed hours.

My race absolutely wouldn’t have been the success that it was if it wasn’t for the following people though…
* John and Lynn for agreeing to house Oscar and Dan for the weekend and for filling my belly with pizza the night before the race and cider at the end!
* James for coming out on early morning training runs with me during the few months leading up to the race and then running the dark scary miles from 52-82 with me during the race.  For putting up with my panicking when I totally miscalculated the amount of time I had left at 1am on Sunday morning and for letting me have a little kip on his space blanket when I got tired.
* Guy for crewing me up to mile 82 where he took over from James as pacer and put up with all my shrieks as the stones destroyed the blisters on my feet!
* Helen for organising a superb team of support and for popping up at several of the crew points along the way.
* Grant for his support out on the course.
* Gary for crewing the majority of my race, taking my sock and shoe off to shake the stones out and heading out to buy a much needed Pot Noodle for me mid race. Hopefully I didn’t make too much of a mess in his car!
* Laura for helping crew a large section of the race and for sharing the buggy pushing with Dan at Clumber Park parkrun!
* Kevin and Amanda for running me into the finish despite having run their own 50 mile race on the Saturday, then driving 160 miles up to Nottingham on Saturday night to see me run mine!  For putting up with me when I sobbed that I just wanted to nap and when I had a melt down because Amanda had miscounted the number of bridges to the next checkpoint!
* Dan for putting up with months and months of 5am alarms and numerous evenings when I was out running instead of staying home.  Also for chasing me round the course with Oscar over the weekend.
* Everybody that wished me good luck or gave me advice in the build up to race day. I felt so supported and honoured to have such lovely friends and family who were willing to do so much to help me achieve my goal.  I still cannot get over the fact that so many people went out of their way on so many levels to help ensure I completed my 100 miles.  I am so grateful to all of my friends for their support.

I took nine days off completely after the Robin Hood 100, and did feel a little lost with what to aim for next, although I have started to construct a plan for 2019 this week.  More to follow soon…!

I ran 100 miles! (Part 2)

(You can find part one of my Robin Hood 100 mile recap here.)

As I left the aid station at mile 30 Dan told me that he planned on heading back to John and Lynn’s house and would be back out in the morning with Oscar to find me on the course.  The trackers during the event were superb I’m told.  All the runners had been given small pager-sized devices on a strong velcro strap and told to attach them to our bags in a place that we could easily reach.  On the front of the device was a small button which, when held for several seconds would alert the Race Director that I was in danger.  Vital I imagine for those runners running on their own, especially those that made it to the canal path whilst it was still dark.  The tracking was real time, and friends and family (as well as those involved in the race organisation) could check that you were still following the correct path or that your tracking dot hadn’t remained still for too long, signalling that perhaps you had had an accident somewhere.  I was told that if either of those cases were to happen I would receive a phone call to check that I was in fact still alright, which was rather reassuring.  The tracker must have been fairly straight forward to use, as even my Dad followed my progress during the race.  Afterwards he told me how he had been concerned that my dot had stopped for too long at the final checkpoint and that I might not make it in time!

At mile 32 I arrived to a crew of Gary and Guy along with Laura.  I stopped for a few minutes here to take some food on and it was nice to have a chat with everyone.  One of the guys noticed that my shoulder looked a little sore from where my bag had been rubbing so pulled out some Glide to rub on.  It didn’t feel sore, but I did still have another 68 miles to go, so best be on the safe side!

The guys told me that Mike (the other runner from our club) was having a great race and currently sitting in 6th position which was lovely news to hear.

The next section was a bit of a low point for me.  It was 7 miles between the crew station at mile 32 and the next one at mile 39, with no aid stations in between.  I didn’t really see many runners during this section for several miles as everyone had started to spread themselves out a bit by this point.  I needed the toilet just as I came across a sign for public toilets and so ducked off the road to find them, although then had to queue along with the public.  One of the few negatives about this event was that these were the only actual toilets on route and the second time I passed them they had been locked up, so all other wees were wild ones – which always becomes progressively more of a challenge as the race goes on!

Gary, Guy and Laura had walked the half mile through the woodland to meet me at mile 39 where I sat with them on the floor for a few minutes and knocked back a chocolate milk.  I really fancied a little sit down when I met them, but I did feel a little stiff as I got going again.

All through the race I never thought of it being 100 miles.  The first big milestone for me to reach was mile 52, when I knew that James would be joining me on my run to pace me for 30 miles to mile 82.

I got a little confused as I left the aid station at mile 41.  This was an aid station at four points on the course due to the way the course was laid out.  (Miles 31, 41, 60 and 70.)  So there were people coming in and leaving in all directions and I started to follow somebody heading out on the loop I had already completed!  Luckily the marshals were on the ball and quickly called me back, sending me off in the correct direction.  That could have been a painful mistake to make!

I came across a horse and rider heading in my direction along the next tarmacked section.  They approached rather quickly but were walking as I passed.  The rider smiled at me and then without any sudden movements, the horse bolted off towards the next runner a way back behind me along the road.

Mile 47 was the next aid station and crew spot.  There was a steep descent on the way into the checkpoint which included climbing over a stile on a rocky step.  When I arrived at Gary’s car I asked if I could have one of the pasta pots I had brought along made up ready for me to have when I reached the next crew stop a little later on.  They told me that James had arrived at the crew point where he would be pacing me from and was just going to grab a quick nap before I arrived.  It was almost dusk as I went to leave the aid station and so I pulled out my headtorch ready for the next section.  It was less than a mile before I needed to turn the light on.  It seemed to turn from day to night really quickly and once again I found myself running on my own with nobody else around.  This section was a really eerie one.  I found myself running alone through thick woodland in the dark, guided only by flashes of reflective tape blowing in the wind as my headtorch caught the edges with it’s beam.  There were a lot of noises in the woods.  I could hear owls and rustling and I did feel rather vulnerable – very grateful of the fact that James would soon be running alongside me from the next aid station.  I had really freaked myself out by mile 50 and the last two miles before the aid station were run at pace just to shorten the time I would be spending running alone!  My Garmin tells me that I was running at 8:40mm pace for a little while there!

I had estimated that it would take me somewhere around 12 hours – 12 hours 30 mins to reach mile 50 and I glanced at my watch to see that it had taken about 12 hours and 15 minutes, although somehow it felt like I had only been out running for a couple of hours.

I sped into the aid station at mile 52 to see Laura and James waiting for me to arrive.  A volunteer told me that chips had just arrived at the aid station and so I sent Laura to grab me a handful.  Up until this point I had just been knocking back picnic type foods, so I was very grateful for the piping hot chips and was glad that I had requested my pasta pot to be ready by the time I reached the next crew station so that I could have a real meal.

I said goodbye to Laura who was returning home from here to continue tracking me on the website.  I grabbed a cup of sugary tea here too and I definitely noticed the boost it gave me.  I left still carrying my tea and James and I walked half a mile or so whilst I finished my drink.  I explained to James that I was still running large sections but that I was also now speed walking parts of every mile, – taking each section as it came.  The only real pressure in the back of my mind being that I needed to cover the ground at 18 minute mile pace on average (including all stops).  Up until this point I had only had one mile which had come over this pace, which had included a stop to see my crew at mile 41.  My walking pace is naturally fairly fast at 15-16 minute miles so it would be the need to stop at aid stations and lack of sleep which would let me down if anything.  I wasn’t too concerned with timings at this point.  I had been a long way off from cut-offs at the South Downs Way 100 in June, and although I had purposefully slowed myself down significantly at this race I still felt in control and like I would be able to speed up if needed.

Running with James was great.  It was lovely to have company after the last 52 miles of solo running.  James had taken part in running an 11 mile leg at the Round Norfolk Relay race for our club team in Norfolk that morning and then driven over to Clumber Park to pace me round 30 miles in the dark.  He filled me in on how our club team had been getting on before he left and we discussed different races we’d run or wanted to run later in the year.

Before running SDW in June I really underestimated just how much help a pacer could be in an event like this.  In future any other races over 50 miles in distance I will absolutely be planning to incorporate pacers and a crew as the people filling these two key roles made such a massive difference to my spirits and desire to achieve at the Robin Hood 100 last weekend.

I felt a little weak by the time we arrived at mile 62 so had a little lay down in the back of Gary’s car whilst Gary and Guy got my pasta pot ready.  Initially I felt like I would struggle to get the pasta down, although knew I would have to force it if that was the case.  I got no more than 7-8 pasta shells down me at mile 54 of SDW and I suffered because of it.  After a few minutes of laying in the back of the car and after eating a couple of shells I started to feel a bit better though and surprised myself by managing to finish the whole pot.  I reminded myself of a character on an old-style video game where they would eat and their health would instantly increase.  When I had arrived at the crew station I was worn down and not very perky but by the time I left I was buzzing again and back into a jog as soon as we got round the corner.  I made sure to put in an order for the second pasta pot later on that morning.

I had a dark patch at 1am on Sunday morning.  All night I tried to calculate times in my head as I ran.  For some reason I counted 1am – 2pm as 11 hours remaining instead of the 13 hours that it actually was.  I can’t remember how many miles I had left by this point, but by selling myself two hours short I knew that I would be fighting the clock the whole way.  I was so confused as I knew I had been so far ahead of the cut-offs for the first half of the race.  I didn’t understand how I could now be cutting it so fine that I might not make it.  I voiced my concerns to James (who didn’t spot my mistake either) and then grew quiet, filled with worry that something which I had not originally been concerned with at all may now pose a threat to the success of my race.  I can’t have been much fun to run with along this section!  It must have been 20-30 minutes before I finally worked out my mistake and felt instantly relieved.  Two hours is a lot of time to lose!

When James and I arrived at the aid station at mile 69 one of the marshals overheard me talking about my mix-up in sums.  He reassured me that the unofficial cut-off time at that aid station was 5:30am, and it wasn’t quite 3:10am when we arrived.  We still had plenty of time!

I stopped for quite a while at mile 76 with my crew, sat in the back of Gary’s car.  I had had what felt like a small stone rubbing in the bottom of my right trainer for the last 8-9 miles, but on removal of my sock and shoe Gary confirmed that this was now where the ridge of my sock was rubbing on the base of my foot.  It didn’t hurt, it was just irritating at this point so I got him to put my trainer back on and decided to deal with the repercussions after the race.  I enjoyed my second pasta pot – I had needed it perhaps two miles sooner than we had arrived annoyingly so once again I felt rather weak on arrival but perked up as more of the pasta disappeared.

It wasn’t long after leaving this checkpoint that my words began to slur into each other as I spoke.  I felt completely drained and knew that a five minute nap would pick me back up again.  I begged James to let me lie down on the floor and take a quick nap but instead he tried to convince me to make it to the next aid station where I would be able to sleep in the back of a car rather than the cold, hard floor.  I knew that with nearly five miles still to go before we hit the next aid station I would never make it though and eventually, as my speech got more and more indistinguishable he decided to pull out his space blanket for me to curl up on for a five minute nap.  I tried to wait patiently by the side of the path as he pulled his blanket out but he seemed to take forever and the blanket kept sticking back on itself, getting more and more tangled up.  Finally it was on the floor and then I didn’t waste any time in laying down on it for a sleep.  I can remember being amazed that I didn’t feel stiff at all getting down to the floor.  My muscles were doing really well!  I must have fallen asleep instantly and awoke what I was told was 12 minutes later to James clapping loudly next to my head to wake me up.  Dawn was starting to break by the time I woke and it was nice to be able to tuck my headtorch back away into my bag.

I was buzzing after that nap and could run long sections of the next track again.  Initially I had been concerned for taking so long out of the race to sleep, but the pay off was definitely worth those few minutes of no movement along the course.

On the approach of the next crew point I snuck off for a wild wee and James jogged ahead to meet up with Gary, Guy and also Helen who had now joined my crew again for this checkpoint following crewing Mike.  I was eager to find out how Mike was doing and was instantly concerned when the guys reluctantly told me that he was still out on the course, – that he hadn’t finished the race yet.  For someone who had planned on running 11 minute miling for the race and who had been holding 6th place when I checked at the halfway point I really hoped that something hadn’t happened to him, but I couldn’t get any more information out of my crew, who stuck to their story that he ‘hadn’t had a good time of it’.

This was the checkpoint where James left and Guy joined me for the remaining twenty miles.  I thanked James, (who was then driving back to Northamptonshire to run a half marathon later that morning!) and then filled Guy in on how my running had gone since I had seen him last.

It was only a couple of miles until the next aid station and as I ran down the hill I could see Oscar and Dan waiting for us at the bottom!

Oscar and I near the end of Robin Hood 100(Picture shared on the Hobo Facebook page)

Oscar was really excited to see me and chatted away to me about his morning.

Oscar and I near the end of Robin Hood 100(Picture shared on the Hobo Facebook page)

Oscar and I near the end of Robin Hood 100(Picture shared on the Hobo Facebook page)

I sat for a few minutes in a chair at the aid station with Dan and Oscar.  The marshals were great with Oscar and he was offered all the watermelon and sweets he could ever eat whilst I spent a few minutes getting myself together ready for the last sixteen miles.

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I thought I might get all of my recap written in two posts this time, but it’s late now and I still have so much to write.  Part three to follow over the next couple of days…