When a race doesn’t go to plan

Last Sunday was the Milton Keynes Running Festival.  An event of 20 mile, half marathon, 10k and 5k distance races all starting from the Xscape Centre in Milton Keynes.

MK half race number

I had entered the event a while back almost on a whim.  I knew I should be halfway into some serious mileage by this point in the build up to the ultras I have coming up for 2018.  I also knew that my half marathon PB is from a very long time ago (December 2013) and was in desperate need of an update.

My training had been going really well since the start of the year, but as always when I intend to race a short distance event I had a few nerves before the start of the race.  A lot of my miles in recent weeks had been treadmill miles due to childcare issues, and I was concerned about transferring my running from a flat, no bumps treadmill to the ups and downs of Milton Keynes redways.  A quick chat on Twitter with some other treadmill runners eased my nerves though, and ultimately I was feeling rather confident with my race plan when I set off for Milton Keynes on Sunday morning.

The plan was to run 9:30mm pace for the first 10 miles, and then if I could, to pick it up to 9mm for the remaining 5k, pushing for those final few miles, finishing somewhere between 2 hours and 2h 5m.  My current PB is 2h 9m 16s.  Just under 10 minute miling which, on paper is so far away from where I feel I actually am at the moment.

I rocked up on my own with a little over an hour before the start, cursing the fact that I hadn’t researched cheaper places to park beforehand as I handed over the £8.32 it cost me to park for four hours by the race start.  A positive being that I was in a car park literally right by the race start though, so there really was no chance of me getting lost trying to find my car again after the race!

I placed myself somewhere between the two hour and two hour ten minute pacer on the start line and planned to constantly check my watch during the first few miles to ensure I was running the pace I had set out to race and not get swept away with people running by too quickly or get stuck behind other runners who had set off too slow.

The gun went.  We all started pretty much on time and my first mile went by spot on as planned in 9 minutes and 30 seconds.  Lots of people from behind where I had started were rushing past me but I stuck to my guns and stayed at the pace I had set out to run.  I ran the second mile in 9m 20s.  With much of the mile either flat or at a slight downhill I struggled to slow any further without feeling like I was ‘braking’ all the time and I didn’t want to end up injured, so leant into the downhill, whilst trying to remain light on my feet.

My third mile went by in 9:41 (so still an average pace of 9:30mm).  Milton Keynes is actually a lovely area to run around.  There are lots of parks and green spaces.  You would never know that you were so close to such a large city.  (It’s not such a lovely area to drive around though.  All the MK roundabouts look the same to me!)

Mile four – 9m 29s.  I was actually feeling nervously excited by this point.  I began to pass by all those people who had raced off at the start in a hurry to get going and had already burnt out too quickly.  I was definitely going to smash my PB.  I felt so strong and the pace felt so easy.  I knew there were still nine miles to go, but I had never run a race before where the pace I started out at was so conserved and still felt so easy after four miles.

Mile five – still going strong.  The top of my left calf started to feel a little tight and I silently vowed to get the foam roller and compression socks out as soon as I got home that night, trying not to think any more about it.

Within metres of the five mile marker pain shot through the top of my calf and ground me to a complete halt.  I desperately tried to flex my leg before setting off at a jog again only to collapse back into a slump as I realised I could no longer run using that leg.  Glancing at my watch in despair, seeing the average pace creep up I hurriedly took myself to the side of the path where I fully stretched out my left leg, desperate for it to let me run the final miles of the race.

I let a few tears trickle down my face when I realised my leg wasn’t going to let me run and a few more fell as I watched my average pace creep up into the 10s.  I rang Dan, upset and angry that the race hadn’t gone to plan, and so desperate for him to give me some magic words of advice to get my leg working again.

He didn’t have any.  And neither did the running friend I chose to ring to cry to about my bodged race attempt, whilst seeing my watch now display an 11mm average pace.  But they did both calm me down and make me realise that this wasn’t my goal race, – that much better any problems rise now, before my goal race so that I could deal with them before they became an issue.

I was limping along the side of the path whilst I tried to ease the pain in my calf.  I wanted to smack every spectator who shouted in an attempt to get me to carry on running (although I do realise they thought they were probably being encouraging) but on the flip side I was so touched by the amount of runners who came past and genuinely asked me if I was OK.  One guy offered me paracetamol, another a spare layer, and several shared words of ‘Tough Luck’ or something to that effect.

By mile six I realised that I would be silly to try and hobble a further seven miles to the finish so stopped to ask a marshal the quickest way to get to the finish line.  He told me that I could either turn around and go back the way I had come, or continue the way I was going.  I figured that at least if I continued the way I was going then I would get a goodie bag containing food at the finish, so traipsed on.

Next panic: I rang Dan to fret that I wouldn’t have enough time on my parking ticket.  I had only gotten four hours from the time I arrived, and with some quick calculations I realised that I would be coming in somewhere around three hours for the half marathon that afternoon.

As Dan was calming me for the second time that morning I overheard a man wearing a 20 mile bib telling a woman that he was hoping to pull at the next marshal point and that he would not be completing the full distance that day.  I ended my conversation with Dan and joined in with the conversation the runners were having, sharing the information that had been given to me by the marshal I had spoken to.  This man (never learnt his name!) lived not too far from me and was honest in saying that he hadn’t put in the training to run 20 miles.  He was suffering with a painful stomach and had done too little, too late when it came to trying to fix it.  I fell into step beside him and having someone to chat to made miles 7-10 go by a whole lot quicker than the 45 minutes it took us to walk.

The guy I was walking with hoped to be able to run the final 5k of his race, so once we reached the 10 mile mark we thanked each other, wished each other well and I saw him run off into the distance.  My leg had begun to ease a little by now and I was able to pick up the pace to a faster walk, completing my 11th mile in just over 13 minutes.  It’s quite satisfying to know that even if it gets to the point where running is no longer an option during the later miles of my 100 in June, I still have a fairly fast walking stride so won’t lose as much time as some by dropping down to a walking pace.

I decided to try and lightly jog the final couple of miles left to the finish, stopping to walk any hills (as these were pretty much impossible without a great deal of discomfort).  (11:10, 11:02)  I passed the guy I had walked with earlier somewhere around mile 12.

The start of the thirteenth mile is on a horrible, horrible uphill slope.  I’d walked it before when traveling between the two Milton Keynes parkruns on the New Year’s Day Double.  I made a point of lightly jogging my way up this time though.  On my toes so as not to stretch my calf to breaking point.  I didn’t need to prove myself to anybody!

500 metres left until the finish after the horrible hill and my leg was feeling a fair bit loser.  I was gliding past other runners – many of whom were walking by this point.  I knew that my leg wasn’t right though and the finish line couldn’t come quick enough!

MK half marathon finish(Image from here)

The commentator shouted out my name as I approached the finish which was a nice touch and I crossed the line to collect my goodies.  Rather disappointed to be given just a banana along with my medal though – I don’t even like bananas!  (It didn’t go to waste…Oscar happily munched on it for dessert later that evening.)

MK half banana and medal

Side note: I find it rather creepy that Strava knows the exact location I took the above picture as shown below in my Strava screenshot…

Strava map of MK Running Festival half marathon

Chip time: 2:50:42
Position: 1387/1436
Gender position:
570/607
Category position (SF):
223/240

I drove home in a grumpy fed-up, feeling-sorry-for-myself state.  Sunday was Mother’s Day and the afternoon before Dan, Oscar and I had been down to the churchyard where my Mum was buried to add flowers to her grave.  She would have been the first person I rang on the way home from the race to have a whinge to and provide a guaranteed pick-me-up.

Mum's grave and Mother's Day flowers

The ground still hasn’t settled enough for us to be able to have a headstone fitted, so Mum’s grave still displays just a standard wooden name cross.

Oscar insisted on choosing a flower from the bunch I had bought for the grave which he then walked around the graveyard holding, smelling from time to time.  Mum would have loved that he wanted to be a part of it all and, as we left, he placed the flower on top of the mound of earth that marks her grave.  Almost as if he knew that’s where he should place it.Oscar at Mum's graveRunning wise, I’m OK.  I feared the worst initially, but a four day family holiday with lots of walking followed by a trip to the physio this morning has actually done me the world of good and I feel refreshed both mentally and physically.  I’ve got some exercises to work on from the physio but essentially I’ve been given the all-clear to continue running high mileage and high volume, just not to include speedwork or hills for the time being, with a follow-up physio visit scheduled for just before Easter.

Milton Keynes Marathon and South Downs Way 100 remain firmly in the calendar.  As does South Downs Way 50, which is in just 3 weeks time.

Bring it on!

Have you ever pulled from or walked a large portion of a race before?
Did you choose flowers for your Mother on Mother’s Day?

 

A marathon update

I have Chelmsford Marathon next Sunday.

Chelmsford Marathon number

In the last four weeks I have run a grand total of three times.

Slowly.

This wasn’t how it was supposed to go!  I was supposed to run Ealing Half Marathon at the end of September and achieving a PB.  Which would then lead nicely into a new PB at Chelmsford Marathon at the end of this month.

It all started out so well…

At the start of the Summer I couldn’t have asked for better results from my training – I PBd in 5 mile, 6 mile and 10k distances all in quick succession.

Then – injury, illness, my Mum being rushed to hospital and a very busy month of work all happened and the three weeks I was forced to take off fell at such a crucial point in my training cycle.

When I run Chelmsford next weekend it will be with the aim of getting round to the finish and completing my twelfth marathon.  There will be no time pressure.  I want to enjoy the race and am looking forward to spending 5+ hours out in the countryside without a toddler wanting me to read the same book for the twelfth time that day and without feeling like I should be tidying up the house or offering help in some way to somebody.

This doesn’t mean that I don’t want to cut my marathon time down further.  Of course I do, but undertrained and returning from injury, this is not the time to be doing that.  With all that has been going on I have lost nearly 2 stone in the last four weeks, so my body is not at it’s strongest currently.

Following my back injury in September, I’ve made several visits to the physio.  I’ve been going to Strong Lines in Wellingborough, and cannot recommend Fred enough.  Since my first visit I’ve been religiously completing my exercises to strengthen my core.  Fred established that my left side is much weaker than my right but my whole core strength is pretty shocking.  Something which deep down I knew, but didn’t know how best to go about fixing.

I have a series of exercises to complete each day, including some resistance band walking and planks in various positions.  Fred used my phone to film me completing the exercises, which makes it super easy to check form and remind myself just what it is I need to be completing each day!

After watching me run on the treadmill, Fred established that my cadence was much too slow.  Something I have focused on in the past.  I currently fall naturally into a rhythm of about 140spm, when actually I should be running closer to 180, so this is something I need to focus on during road runs over the coming weeks as well.

I’m feeling so confident that I will be able to see improvements in my running with the addition of proper core work this Winter.  I can already feel the benefits of the exercises after just a few weeks.

I received my annual rejection magazine from VLM for 2018 last week along with everybody else I know who hadn’t already guaranteed their place through a Good For Age entry or deferral. London Marathon rejection magazine 2018 A couple of weeks earlier though I was lucky enough to be announced as an ambassador for Milton Keynes Marathon 2018.  Milton Keynes was my very first marathon back in 2012 and so I have a soft spot for the race, having run it three times now (2012, 2013 and 2015) with the half marathon last year whilst pregnant.  I’ve always enjoyed the event and it has been lovely to watch it grow into such a successful race in such a short amount of time.  (The first Milton Keynes Marathon was held in 2012 the first year I ran it.)

You can read all about the other ambassadors on the MK Marathon website.

As well as Chelmsford marathon next weekend I will be running Gower marathon in November.  A tough, off-road, coastal trail marathon with a whole bunch of my running friends.  We go every year (although I couldn’t last year as Oscar was only a few weeks old at the time).  I’m really looking forward to the weekend away.  I could definitely do with one at the moment!

After that I just have a couple of cross-country races pencilled in to end the year and I was thinking about entering Bedford half marathon in December to try and finish off the year on a high.  My half marathon PB is in desperate need of updating, sitting at 2:09 from many years ago.

I haven’t fully organised next year’s calendar yet, but the target will be Milton Keynes Marathon in May.

Oh, and this…! 😉

Have you ever had to go on the wait list for a race?
Do you add in much core work to your weekly training?

The Round Norfolk Relay 2017

Last year I was so, so excited to hear that there was a group from my club hoping to run the Round Norfolk Relay.  A bit of bad timing on my part, to be 37 weeks pregnant and therefore resigned to a member of crew for the event, rather than being able to run though.

This year – not pregnant – my name was going on the running list!

I grew up in North Norfolk, although would not have classed myself as a runner whilst living there, so still have lots of running routes which I need to explore out that way.  Most specifically those around the North Norfolk coastline, where I grew up.

The Round Norfolk Relay is a 198 mile route run around the border of the county, starting at Kings Lynn in the West.  The 198 miles are split into 17 unequal stages so each team entered is made up of 17 runners, as well as a whole host of crew and timekeepers to help man them out on the route.

As one of the slower runners showing initial interest, I expected to be allocated a short road stage, so was rather surprised to learn that I would be running the 11 off-road miles between Cley and Cromer, within a few minutes driving distance from my parents’ house.

I knew the stage would be tough, starting on a deep shingle beach.  I had fully intended on recceing the route over the Summer but with the route being unbuggy friendly and my Summer flashing by before my eyes – especially towards the end, I never got the opportunity to test out the route before the day.

This year, our club had gone from entering one team to two.  Somehow we had found 34 runners to agree to run a stage of the race, as well as a handful of members to act as timekeeper, assist with support vehicles and generally help out where needed on the day.

The guidelines we had been given from the organiser within our club were to arrange transport with the club runner in the other team running the same stage as you.  i.e. you would both drive to the finish of your stage, leave one car there before hopping in the other to drive back to the start of the stage.  When you had both run the leg, you would be able to jump into the car left at the finish to go and collect the person’s car at the start again.

Sounds complicated, but in theory, should work well.
In practice, things were a little close at times.  I was due to meet Zac, the other runner who was running Stage 5 at Cromer by 11:30am.  At 12:45 when he said he was just leaving Wells (22 coastal miles away) to drive over and meet me, I told him I would find alternative arrangements and that he should head straight to the start…Zac was due to start his leg in just under half an hour, so would never have made it back to the start in time otherwise!

Waiting for my lift at the Round Norfolk Relay in CromerGood job it was really sunny in Cromer whilst I waited for my lift!)

Waiting for my lift at the Round Norfolk Relay in CromerI can see the sea!

Luckily, my brother was at home and free, so managed to collect me from Cromer and drop me off to my start in time.

Zac at the Round Norfolk Relay

Zac set off on his leg not long after I arrived in Cley.  It was raining by this point, with a cold wind, and I had wrapped myself up in a coat pulled high up around my neck.  I sat huddled in our timekeeper’s car until it neared my estimated start time.  When we had first signed up as a team, we each had to give a rough minute mile pace for how long we expected to complete our stages, based on distance and terrain which was then converted into an overall running time.  I had estimated 9:30mm pace for an offroad section of just short of 11 miles.  My running had been going really well over the Summer and I had been fairly confident I would be able to hit that pacing.

Round Norfolk Relay WDAC Team 1

That is, until my back had ‘gone’ earlier in the week.  I had managed an easy 6 miles of trail with a friend on the Wednesday evening.  My back had seemed to loosen up after the first mile, but by the Friday before the race, I was in agony walking around school.  I spent most of my time between lessons sat with the school nurse whilst he swapped a heated pack for a cool one, or the other way around.  Ibuprofen got me through each day, and every morning I hoped that the pain would have started to fade.  I’ve had bad back pain in the past, but it has never lasted more than a few days before.  The day before the race I could not even stand upright.

Stage 5 of the Round Norfolk Relay

Resigned to abandoning my target pace, but not abandoning my teammates, I drove over to Norfolk on the morning of the race.  My Dad pressed a pack of double-strength Ibuprofen into my hand, and I made sure to take them at the optimum time to let them do their job before the run begun.  I had no idea how the run would go.  I hadn’t tried running again since the Wednesday evening, but my back had felt better for getting out for a run then.  I knew I needed to see a physio the following week, and planned on playing it sensible out on the course – stopping and pulling from the race if my back didn’t loosen up the same way it had done on the trail run on Wednesday.  I wasn’t sure of the rules on stage DNFs, but found out after the race that each team may have up to three DNFs, each one being given a forfeit time of the slowest time for that stage from the previous year plus five minutes.

Double strength Ibuprofen

I headed out of the car a few minutes before my estimated start time, and could just see the bright green club vest of Kat, the runner before me gradually bobbing closer – giving me enough time to clip together my UD bag and take my place at the handover marker.

Kat arrived pretty much dead on target time and I shot off across the shingle as she thrust the baton at me, wishing me luck for my stage.  Although the pace on my watch initially showed 9:xx, it gradually slowed until it beeped at 10:27 for the first mile.  I convinced myself that it didn’t matter – this was the toughest section on the shingle and I would easily be able to pull my time back later on in the race.

In actual fact, that was my fastest mile.

Within the first two miles I’d dropped my race instructions and then had to chase them across the beach.  They were written across four pages as they were fairly detailed.  I also almost got the baton stuck inside my vest as I pulled my hand through the top of my jacket.  It wasn’t going well!

On the plus side though, either the Ibuprofen had really kicked in or the running was doing wonders for my back.  I couldn’t feel a thing!Me at the Round Norfolk Relay

My face and lack of uprightness in this photo gives you a little idea how tough stage 5 actually was.  I had already run four miles of shingle beach by this point, and was about to try climbing a shingle bank.  I’d referred to my instructions numerous times and already stopped to remove my jacket, for it was far too hot to run in two layers as well as a waterproof by the time my stint began.

When I left the shingle beach, my climb began and the steep hill that had always looked so pretty on the outskirts of Sheringham loomed ahead of me.  I’m not ashamed to say that I walked large portions of my stage – all of the steep hills I ended up walking, although I ran all of the flats and downhills as fast as I was able to try and make up for it.

Several runners passed me – all much faster than I was.  It was clear that most teams had chosen a faster runner for this stage!

A runner passed me along the slipway at Sheringham beach.  She shouted out that she had been following me as she had no idea where to go.  I then went on to stop her twice from going wrong before we even left Sheringham!

Beeston Bump is another place I have driven past so many times during my time living in Norfolk.  I worked just a few miles away in West Runton for many years.  I’ve always wanted to climb the Bump and look out from the top.  I didn’t get much chance to enjoy the view as I puffed and panted my way to the top on this day though!

The runner who had passed me at Sheringham appeared again.  She kept speeding off but then at every junction spent ages working out which way to go by studying the instructions.  She was definitely somebody who would have benefitted from a recce of the course beforehand!  I shouted out ahead to her several times which way to turn and she held up her hand in thanks.

As we approached East Runton I could see Dawn, my support cyclist in the distance.  I’ve never been happier to see a familiar face!  That had been some incredibly tough running!  I managed to puff out between breaths that this race had been even harder than running the 70 mile race the other year.  Between us Dawn and I shouted several times to the lady just ahead as 5 or 6 times she turned down wrong tracks.  The lady’s bike escort hadn’t materialised and so Dawn asked if I minded if she cycled on up ahead to make sure she didn’t go wrong again.  Of course I didn’t.  Each runner should have been accompanied by a cyclist when running alongside a road during the day.  At night, the cyclist would be replaced by a car escort for safety.  Dawn came back alongside me after putting the lady right, but I was too knackered to be able to chat much by this point!

I turned into the final field at Cromer to see the club chairman cheering me in.  His wife was running the stage following mine, so he nipped across the field to let her know I was on my way.  I thrust the baton into her hand and apologised profusely for my slower-than-planned time.  She was lovely and told me not to worry in the slightest, before setting off for stage 6 of the relay.

In looking at the results following the event, it was reassuring to see that somehow I wasn’t the slowest runner on my stage!  The fastest runner ran the stage in 1h 9m 09s.  I was nearly an hour slower than that time in 2h 1m 43s – which worked out as nearly 20 minutes slower than my predicted time.

Despite my poor time estimation, our team had actually done quite well at guessing how long we would take.  We had declared 27h 47m 58s before starting the race, and finished in 27h 48m 59s – just 1minute and 1second away from our prediction, winning us the Carrot Shield for best time prediction!

Overall our team finished in 48th position out of 61 teams, with our B team coming in 54th.  We had a proper mix of abilities within our runners so it was nice that even though we had been so inclusive we weren’t right at the bottom of the finishing table.  Our B team had hit a few problems during the race; one runner hadn’t made it to the start of his stage, so had to DNS, another dropped out as a DNF and one runner had to hold back starting their stage because the bike escort for that section hadn’t arrived in time to accompany them along their road stint.

All of us thoroughly enjoyed the event though, even those of us with tough stages(!)

All runners from both teams met at the pub the following week to be given our medals and for us to present a card and gift to Zac as a thank-you for organising our entry into the event.  No easy task!

The medals are beautiful.  Larger than my VLM medal from 2014 and with a lovely design incorporating several Norfolk elements on the front, and a list of all clubs taking part on the back, with the placenames of all of the stages around the outside.

Round Norfolk Relay 2017 medal

Round Norfolk Relay 2017 medal

I’m hoping to get some training in over the Winter along this route on days that my Dad agrees to watch Oscar for me.  It will definitely be some good strength training going into marathon/ultra season next Spring.

And then I will be back at the Round Norfolk Relay again next year.  Although, I’m not so sure I’ll go for the same stage this time!  Stage five requires someone with a little more speed and strength behind them on the team! 😉

Have you ever taken part in a team race before?
What is the most difficult terrain you have run across?

Mud, glorious mud and lots of wool

I managed to get out with my Garmin strapped firmly on several times last week.  Always a challenge when there’s a baby involved!  I’m trying to increase my running frequency over the next couple of weeks.  I have an ultra coming up in April which presents enough challenges now that I’m a Mum without worrying that my mileage has been much lower than pre-pregnancy.

Monday was my first run of the week.  I usually get up early on a Monday morning and run before Dan heads off to work but I had already arranged to head over for the Monday evening group club run last week instead.  It’s the first time that I had run out with the group on a Monday night.  Before Oscar, Dan and I always used to head over to our local pub quiz on a Monday night, but we can no longer attend that now that O is here.

It absolutely tipped it down on Monday and at one point we were showered with freezing cold hail too.  I hate the feeling of hail hitting your face and your face being sent into completely numb shock!  I should have woken up early and got my run in first thing perhaps after all!  We didn’t bother with a cool down upon reaching our cars – it was quick goodbyes and car heaters turned up full blast for all before I drove quickly home for a nice warm bath and my tea.

Wednesday was the club trail run and we covered a further six miles across muddy fields and footpaths.  I’m feeling so strong on the Wednesday night trail runs just lately and it has really boosted my confidence to be running so far towards the front of the group of runners that I run out with.  My core strength has improved loads from carrying Oscar regularly during the day and I swear this is why my trail running has improved so much.  I would say that across trail I am definitely running back where I was pre-pregnancy, perhaps even stronger now.  (Good job my upcoming ultra will be run over trail!)

Saturday it was time for parkrun.  Annoyingly I managed to leave my breast pump at my parents’ house the day before so had to bring Oscar along, despite Dan offering to have him for the morning.

It was raining slightly, and there was even a bit of snow at one point, so I wrapped him up well with lots of layers, two blankets and a rain cover.  He was definitely very snuggly under all that lot and loved watching the other runners go by!

Going to parkrun with Oscar in the pramGarmin time: 45:08
Official time: 
45:11
Position: 
405/416
Gender position: 
154/160
Age category position: 
28/30

Quick side note to say that the blanket pictured above is the second one my friend Hollie has crocheted for Oscar.  Isn’t she super talented?!  I would love to be able to make something like this!  I did recently knit a monkey for a friend’s new baby, but I’ve never managed to master crochet or clothes.

Oliver's knitted monkey

There’s something special I think about receiving hand made gifts.  All the time and effort that went into creating them and the thought that goes along with it too.  Jane sent Oscar a lovely set of booties and a hat that she had made when he was first born in our club’s green colour.  When he gets a little bigger he will be fully decked out in WDAC green with his knitted items along with the mini club vest he was given from a friend.

Oscar's knitted hat and booties

On Sunday there was a six mile trail run organised.  I knew that if I got up early enough I would be able to feed Oscar twice before leaving, park a little way away at the local Tescos, run to the meeting point and then get in an extra couple of miles around the park before meeting up with the others.  5:30am alarm set for a 9am meet up!  I don’t think I’ll be accidentally leaving my pump at my parents’ house again!

There had been a lot of rain around these parts last week and it was fairly muddy once I hit the park.  Stupidly, I picked some of the muddiest trails for my warm-up run too.  It was down one of these muddy trails that I felt my foot slide out from under me and in slow-motion saw my right leg go down into a large muddy puddle!  Somehow I managed to keep my left leg standing so I never fully went in, but my right leg was absolutely covered!  Usually if you don’t pussy-foot around the edge of puddles and run straight through you miss the slippery mud, but on Sunday the bottom of the puddles seemed to be just as treacherous.

Muddy trail run legsAt least it was during my solo warm-up run when I fell so no-one was around to see me go down.  No hiding from it though with all that mud on my leg advertising my fall! One of the other ladies slipped over later too so it wasn’t just me.

I had to nip into Tesco for a few bits after my run so mooched around the aisles with my mud covered leg on show.  It wasn’t until I got home that I also had flecks of mud across my face – even covering my lips and eyelid!  Nobody stopped and stared at me anyway!

Annoyingly, despite feeling fine after the fall and for the remainder of my 10ish mile run my right thigh has felt rather bruised yesterday and today.  Going downstairs has been a little uncomfortable and it really doesn’t help that Oscar has been insisting on practising standing on the top of my legs this week!  Two days of rest and I’ll see how I am tomorrow evening at the trail run again.

As well as managing to fit several runs in last week, I also headed out on lots of walks with Oscar in the baby carrier.  I was gifted the We Made Me Pao Papoose 3-in-1 Front and Back Baby Carrier* from my work colleagues when I headed off on maternity leave in the Autumn and it has really come in so handy.  Once you know how to get it on and how to strap Oscar safely in, it’s so much quicker and easier than lugging a pram around.  It also means that we are able to go offroad without the worry about whether or not a buggy will fit down little tracks or if there will be any stiles to cross!

Walking with Oscar in the baby carrier

I’m really hoping that Oscar will grow up as an outdoorsy-child and not one obsessed with computer games or watching YouTube on the iPad.  Dan and I aren’t big television watchers.  I never have been really – always having preferred to be outside and doing something rather than sat down stationary in front of the box.  I hope I’m setting a good example to him with everything that I do.  I can only try my best, right?

Did you have an active childhood?
Do you mind going shopping in your running gear?