A parkrun catchup

It’s been a while since I posted any details from the parkruns I’ve run.  Over the past few months I’ve gradually ticking off more parkruns, getting ever closer to that magic number 100.  I have just 16 left to go now before I can apply for my 100 runs t-shirt.  I haven’t made much of a dent in achieving the parkrun tourist status this year though.  In total I have run 12 different events, so still have another 8 to go before I can buy my cow cowl.

I did just find an amazing parkrun tourism tool which has whet my appetite for more tourism.  It allows you to enter your parkrun ID and postcode and then shows you the nearest 10/20/30 parkruns to where you are based.  You can also choose to not include those parkruns which you have already run so you can see where your best options are to head to next.

parkrun tourism toolI’ve already run the nine closest parkruns to me so it looks like Rutland Water will be featuring on my results list next!  Wimpole Estate is another one I need to tick off in the near future as well.  I’ve had lots of good feedback about the event just lately.

Here is where I’ve been on my six most recent parkruns…

parkrun #79 – Northampton
6th May

Northampton parkrun is a great course for running with the buggy.  The paths are wide and although it is a super crowded course at the start, the numbers toward the back soon start to thin out.  There are wide grass verges for most of the distance, so even if I feel rather uneasy about pushing the buggy along the path at the start of the run for fear of clipping somebody’s heels, I can always stick to the safer option of running on the sidelines until the crowds start to thin.

Northampton parkrun with the buggyI use my parkruns with Oscar to catch up on all the gossip(!)Northampton parkrun with the buggy(Photos by Martyn Haworth posted on the Northampton parkrun Facebook page)
Official time: 32:55
Position: 459/609
Gender position: 148/256
Age category position: 21/36

Magic Mile #4 – Northampton
6th May

I completely ran out of time to write about this event back in May but for the first time ever I WAS FIRST LADY across the finish line!  Something which I am sure will never happen again and was purely down to the luck of no fast ladies being around to run the mile that day.
I am counting it though.  I didn’t even realise until the results were published the following day that I had been the first female through the finish!  Granted, there weren’t a huge number of runners.  But first lady = first lady…right?!

Official time: 8:09
Position: 18/29
Gender position: 1/7

I finished in the exact same time I had during my previous Magic Mile back in March, which was much better than I thought I would do.  My legs had a marathon and a 50 mile ultra in them from recent weeks, and I had completed very little work at any speed since the previous event.  I would like to think I could beat this time now though.

parkrun #80 – Corby
13th May

So, when I said that Oscar-parkruns are used to catch up on gossip, I haven’t actually stuck solely to this lately.  Most of my parkruns have been gossip runs!  An easy run at chatty pace to keep the legs ticking over and to keep my social side happy on a Saturday morning.
Official time: 29:40
Position: 64/131
Gender position: 16/58
Age category position: 5/8

parkrun #81 – Sheringham
3rd June

I woke up to this on the Saturday morning…

Bruised knee

My knee had been a little sore to kneel on for the past few days, but had not been sore when walking or running and there was no evidence of any bruising or damage at all.
…until the Saturday morning.  The day before I was due to run the Shires and Spires 35 mile ultra.
I quickly snapped this shot and posted it on my Facebook wall alongside a brief paragraph detailing the above information.  Immediately afterwards I switched off my phone and chose to ignore any advice given until after I’d tested out my knee at Sheringham parkrun.  (True runner stubbornness right there!)

The Sheringham parkrun is tough – there’s ‘Heartbreak Hill’ at mile 3 and the course is run through woodland, over lots of lumps and bumps!

I ended up hanging around for my Dad in the morning as he was going to take Oscar for a walk in the buggy so that I could run child-free for a change.  He made us late though and the engine was barely off in the car before I was yanking the running buggy out of the back of the car, giving Dad the fastest lesson in how to steer and brake with Oscar strapped safely inside and then legging it down to the start line.  I wasn’t the only one and despite several minutes of flat-out running I still managed to turn the final corner just in time to hear ‘3-2-1′ and see the runners shooting off into the distance.  The woman who had been a few metres in front of me slumped into a defeated walk at this point.  I eventually caught the back runners and began picking runners off along the way.

When I ran through the finish, Dad was there eagerly telling me that he must have run at least three miles with Oscar as he had walked so fast during the last half hour.  I did point out to him that parkrun is only 3.1 miles, of which I had run all the way and that he had been there at the finish waiting for me to cross the line, so I doubted that he had walked as far as 3 miles, but I don’t think I got through to him!

Official time: 31:20
Position: 108/201
Gender position: 25/73
Age category position: 3/6

I had several responses to my Facebook knee query by the time I turned my phone back on again, including a message from a physio associated with the club who informed me that it was very easy to catch the structures in the knee without really noticing at the time.  Even though it was most likely only a very small catch in the knee, because I kneel on the floor so much as a new Mum it ends up looking much worse as the bleeding inside the knee spreads over much greater knee surface from repeated kneeling with Oscar.  Because Dan had been away during the week I had bathed Oscar alone every evening, likely putting the extra pressure on my kneecap, distributing the blood further across my knee surface.  (I went on to run 35 miles the next day without issue.)

parkrun #82 – Corby
10th June

Corby parkrun with Laura Laura was volunteering at the track in Corby again, so I decided to head over and join her for a social chatty run before her shift began.Corby parkrun with LauraOfficial time: 30:27
Position: 95/182
Gender position: 20/81
Age category position: 3/13

parkrun #83 – Kettering
17th June

Several runners from my club were planning on running over to Kettering for the parkrun and then back again to make up their long run for the weekend.  Since having Oscar I can’t really commit to running long runs at the weekend with others so I said I would meet them over there for the parkrun part of the run.  Running the group long runs isn’t fair on Dan, or Oscar whilst he is in nursery all week (since I’ve been back at work).  I want to see some of them both at the weekend!

Kettering parkrun with OscarOfficial time: 32:25
Position: 230/367
Gender position: 83/176
Age category position: 9/14

A lady from Oscar’s ‘Stay and Play’ group was there running without her baby and I chatted to her briefly at the start, and again as I passed her out on the course.  She muttered at me as I ran past her pushing O in the final mile, but I hope us running past helped her to achieve the course PB she achieved a few minutes later. :)

parkrun #84 – Huntingdon
24th June

I still hadn’t fully made up my mind as to which parkrun I was headed to by Saturday morning last week.  I had put a shoutout on Facebook for parkrun recommendations but despite several suggestions, none really took my fancy.  I set out intending to run Kettering parkrun but when it came to it, my body went into work-mode when I got into my car and I found myself heading in the direction of the school I work at, so Huntingdon became the new plan.  I hadn’t run the course in a while anyway, and I knew there would be some new, pretty trails for me to run the extra three miles I needed to tack onto my parkrun that morning in order to make up the six miles on my training plan for the day.

I ran the parkrun much harder than intended in the end.  I should really be running parkruns at 10:50-11:40mm pace, as Saturdays are one of my ‘easy run’ days.  I’m finding it so hard not to push myself around others when I’m running solo though.  I really must make an effort to run slowly this coming weekend.  It’s much more important to make it to the start line of the marathon in October at the moment than to cut a few seconds from my parkrun time.

At the end I got my barcode scanned and was about to start jogging back to the car when a familiar face looked up from the grass and waved hi.  I automatically smiled in response and returned the greeting, whilst racking my brains as to who this person was!  Lately I’ve chatted to several people at events who I follow/follow me on Instagram/Twitter, but I couldn’t place this lady at all.  Later that day I eventually worked out that she was one of the TAs from my school.  I just hadn’t connected her with running, as I have always seen her in a school environment before!

Official time: 28:53
Position: 157/297
Gender position: 37/118
Age category position: 3/14

Have you seen people you know from outside of running at events before?
What is your parkrun tourism total?

Easter fun

I have six boxes of year 11 coursework to finish marking by Friday, a house to tidy, emails to respond to, blogs to catch up on, posts of my own to write (I’ve run a marathon, Magic Mile, two parkruns AND a 10k race I’m yet to blog about) but the end is finally in sight!  My coursework deadline is this coming Friday and then my evenings and mornings will be mine once again!

For now, here is a long overdue post about our first holiday as a family of three (eight!)…

Dan and I somehow managed to squeeze in a four day holiday to Shropshire with friends over the Easter weekend.  I say ‘somehow’ but the fixture was firmly in the calendar minutes after it had been suggested and was talked about for months leading up to our stay away.

Dan, I, Oscar, two other couples from our friendship group and a dog all made our way over to a beautiful quirky little cottage in the middle of nowhere on Good Friday afternoon.

Holiday house in Shropshire

The plan was to fill our days with long walks, good food, pubs, late night drinking and board games.  The weekend did not disappoint.

The weekend away was Oscar’s first holiday and I filled the boot of Dan’s car with toys, spare baby bedding and clothes, the running buggy and somewhere I managed to fit in a bag full of clothes for Dan and me as well!

Oscar playing with stacking cups

One of our friends suggested some parkrun tourism at Ludlow parkrun on the Saturday and both Dan and I jumped at the chance to join in.

On the drive over, we appeared to be driving more and more into the depths of a valley.  I think all four of us questioned our eagerness to be up and out for a parkrun at this point!

The course appeared to be a giant figure of eight loop which we ran twice.

Ludlow parkrunIt was rather hilly.

Ludlow parkrun

We were warned about the hills as part of the briefing, but it wasn’t until we were about 3k into the event that all four of us realised just how much the hills were taking effect!

Ludlow parkrun

It was a really nice event though, and seemed to have a proper community feel to it.Ludlow parkrun with Dan, John and LynnGarmin time: 30:33
Official time: 30:34
Position: 72/129
Gender position: 17/53
Age category position: 4/7

There seemed to be quite a lot of tourists at Ludlow for the Easter weekend, and I even bumped into another runner wearing a St Neots half marathon t-shirt, which is a race local to us.

As we were staying away for three nights, each couple cooked dinner for one night and breakfast on one morning which was a lovely way of splitting up the responsibility of the meals.

Although I cook every night of the week for Dan and I back at home, my meals are nothing fancy, so I decided to let him take on the task of cooking the meal for the Saturday night.  He went for marinated chicken with tomatoes on the vine and sweet potato wedges.

Chicken with tomato on the vine

I followed up on Sunday morning with my signature dish – American pancakes with blueberries.

American pancakes with blueberriesAs my turn fell on Easter morning, I also added little chocolate Lindt bunnies to all the placemats for breakfast too.  We were all pretty full that morning!

Each of the days we all headed out on a long walk with the dog, whilst I wore Oscar out in the baby carrier.

Oscar, Dan and I in ShropshireFYI Shropshire: those walks are not buggy friendly!

Walking in Shropshire

(This was a stile, about 400m into our ‘buggy friendly’ walk on the Saturday afternoon!)

Castle in Shropshire

There was lots to see on our walks; a castle, bluebells, and we even saw a couple of deer out on our Sunday afternoon walk.

Bluebells in Shropshire

Oscar behaved perfectly and pretty much stuck to his down-to-bed-by-8pm-and-up-again-at-7am routine, with just a slight blip on the last night when we woke him at 2am by banging around too loudly in the kitchen.  Dan got the brunt of it, staying up with him until after 4am so that I could sleep ready for the early morning feed.  Not cool Oscar.  Not cool!

Hanging out on holiday in Shropshire

We all decided that the Easter weekend getaway should be pencilled in to our calendars for the rest of forever, with all future children and pets to join us!

Walking in Shropshire

(A couple of the above pictures were stolen from John and Lynn, and the Ludlow parkrun pictures were taken from their Facebook page.)
Did you go away over the Easter weekend?  (Feels like forever ago now!)
What have been your favourite holidays away with friends?

South Downs Way 50 – part 1

My come-back race following pregnancy was a 50 miler.

That may seem daft, but I needed to set myself a real challenge – something that would be achievable if I was determined enough, yet still challenging.

Yeah, I’ve been to parkrun a handful of times since Oscar was born six months ago, and I did run our club trail half marathon back in February.  But running the trail half was just that – a ‘run’, rather than a race and, knowing so many of the other runners and marshals out on the course meant that I didn’t really push myself the way I usually would in a race environment.

I was watching the weather forecast for several days in the build up to Saturday’s 50 miles.  Somehow I always seem to pick marathons and ultras that fall on ridiculously hot days and the 2017 South Downs Way looked like it wasn’t going to be an exception.

I was traveling down with another runner from my club, – Kev – and in order to arrive in time I needed to be out my door and in my car on the way to his house by 4:10am.  I was convinced that Oscar would wake when my alarm rang at 3:40 but he slept soundly through.  Good job actually, as I barely made it round in time as it was.  When I did finally make it into the car, I got 5 minutes up the road before realising that I had forgotten my trainers!  Quick spin of the car and back down the street I went.  Luckily there isn’t too much traffic in our town at 4am on a Saturday morning!

Kev’s sister who lived nearby was going to drop us down to the start and pick us up again at the finish so that we didn’t have to worry about the logistics of returning home from a point-to-point race.  (We all know how well I manage to organise myself for those!)

I’ve run several ultras now but I think this is the only one I have ever been nervous at before the race began.  I wasn’t nervous about the running – more the ‘mumming’ and the fact that I was still breastfeeding, yet spending the best part of a day (ended up being just short of 24 hours!) away from home.  My handheld pump and two large bottles took up a large portion of my ultra bag meaning that there was no room for the leftovers from the standard pre-race takeaway pizza I’d ordered the night before.

Ultimate Direction running bagIt’s taken me several ultras to get my nutrition right (for me) Not being able to take my salty pizza, not having a bag drop on route to leave any chocolate milk, being unable to use any gels (due to breastfeeding) and without a supply of nuun tablets (they no longer stock in the UK) were all factors leaving me in the unknown for Saturday’s event.

We had our kit checked on arrival.  Centurion had opened up registration the night before to ease the load on the registration desks, and it obviously did the trick, as it never felt over-busy at the race HQ.  After carefully packing and repacking my bag numerous times the day before I was dreading have to unpack it all for somebody to check through again, but the lady on registration only wanted to see that I was carrying two headtorches and a base layer in my bag and didn’t look for any of the other kit.  Several of the items I had initially intended on taking with me on the run had ended up getting downgraded to the drop bag which I left for Centurion to transport to the finish once the race had begun.  This included my suncream – after I had coated (or so I thought) my arms, legs and face.

Expressing was done at the last possible moment and took much longer than I initially thought it would, meaning that the majority of other runners had already headed down to the starting field by the time I emerged from the toilet block.  Along with two others from our club, Kev and I listened to the race briefing whilst the sun felt like it burnt through our clothes.  There wasn’t a cloud in the sky and it was so warm, – it wasn’t even 9am yet!

South Downs Way 50 start

When the race started I presumed the running field would quickly separate and for runners to be very spaced out as I’ve come to expect from ultras.  This wasn’t the case at all though.  There was a narrow exit to the field, so within minutes we were all walking to avoid bottlenecking, and then the track the exit led out onto was narrow, rutted and stony, – causing runners to stay bunched together.  It was probably a good 18-20 miles before there was ever any stretch of the run where I wasn’t within a couple of minutes of another runner.

As it always does, the first mile went by quickly.  I don’t mean to sound like one of those people, but 50 miles doesn’t sound like a long way now.  Having covered the distance before, I have confidence in being able to complete the distance.  With ultra events it becomes so difficult to compare times as course profiles are so varied, and different weather across different years can play such a big part in how well you do on the day.  It means that I find the pressure is much less than over a fast 5k race.

South Downs Way 50 elevation

I walked the uphills, ran the downhills and ran/walked the flat depending on how technical the track was.  My aim in any ultra is just to keep moving.  Another concern for this time round, as I knew I would need to stop at some point in order to express.

Just before mile 10 I felt my sock rubbing on the heel of my right foot.  At the very last minute, I had decided to run the race in an old pair of road shoes rather than my usual trail shoes.  The thinking behind this was that it hadn’t rained for weeks, so the ground would be hard, and my feet were likely to swell in the heat – with my road shoes offering more comfort and flexibility than the trails do.  I’ve never had an issue with any of my Asics trainers (road or trail) rubbing before, and I think on Saturday the rubbing was probably due to the steep climbs combined with the heat of the day.  When I paused to readjust my sock (initially thinking it had just slipped down below the trainer line) I realised that it had rubbed right through!  The socks I was wearing were fairly thin (so that my feet didn’t sweat too much) and luckily also fairly long, so I folded down the top of the sock over the now-missing sock heel and hoped for the best.  At this point, just over 40 miles still to go did sound like a lot!

In actual fact, the left heel ended up rubbing through entirely as well.  Although I didn’t actually realise this until I made it back to the changing rooms at the end of the race.Holey socks

Kev caught up with me at this point and we ran together for perhaps a mile here before he ran on ahead.  I saw him again leaving the first checkpoint as I arrived but then not again until the finish.

The first checkpoint was at mile 11.  Those first 11 miles flew by, and felt so, so easy.  I knew the first major hill was coming up after that checkpoint.  Initially I had considered stopping to express here, but it was so manic and busy that there was no opportunity for that to happen.  There were people coming in to the checkpoint constantly and it was a flurry of activity.  I snatched a couple of slices of watermelon (so satisfying) and a handful of ready salted crisps to get my salt fix and continued on my way, having to stop for what felt like forever before I was told it was safe enough to cross over the busy main road.  I pulled out the sole mini carton of chocolate milk I’d stashed away in my bag.  I figured it would probably taste pretty horrid later on in the day by the time it had warmed up and so what better time to enjoy it than now?!  I’d already munched through two nakd bars on my way to the first checkpoint.South Downs Way 50 mile 12

There was a photographer nearing the top of the first big climb.

South Downs Way 50 mile 12It was a pretty steep climb – I couldn’t see anyone attempting to run up it although I’m sure some of the front runners must have done!

South Downs Way 50 mile 12

Along the top of this ridge was the only point which I pulled out my phone to take pictures, although I wish I’d taken more on the day.

South Downs Way 50 mile 12You can see how bright the day really was in this photo.  There is literally not a single cloud anywhere in the sky!  I could already feel the tops of my legs starting to burn by now, but there wasn’t anything I could do about it.  The following day it was easy to spot areas I had missed when applying the suncream!

As I hadn’t expressed at checkpoint one, I intended on expressing at checkpoint two (16 miles), and then again later on in the race, but when I reached checkpoint two, it was a very small area with nowhere to get out of the way and go unseen, so I just grabbed a couple of scotch eggs and ran on, thinking that surely there would be a wooded area or secluded spot I could stop at before the next checkpoint at mile 26.

Turns out the South Downs are the most open area of land I have ever come across.  There was nothing but track, grass and the odd gorse bush for miles and miles.  Apart from dozens of families out for a day in the sun that is.  Families who probably wouldn’t appreciate if I sat on the side of the track with a breast pump in hand!

I chatted to several other runners along the way – something I love about the more relaxed nature of trail/ultra running that you just don’t get in road races.  At one point I shouted a runner back from up ahead as he had sped off down the wrong track.  Probably saved him a few miles!

Mile 27 ticked over on my watch before I turned in for checkpoint number three.  This one was held in a barn, and I think I rather surprised the sole female marshal I could find when I stated that I was still breastfeeding, and would really appreciate if I could nip behind the combine harvester in the barn out of the way to express!  Luckily this was fine, and so I grabbed a couple of ham wraps and my recently filled water bottles and lowered myself to the dusty ground behind the machinery.  I quickly called Dan here whilst I expressed to see how he had been getting on with Oscar and to let him know that I was doing fine – much better than expected in fact and I still felt super strong.  Dan told me that he had dressed Oscar suitably for the day and sent a picture.

Oscar in his Ultra runner in training vestWith expressing and repacking my bag again afterwards I was in the back of the barn for a total of 25 minutes.  It felt like forever, and my legs agreed when I tried to get up.  I never sit down in races, especially not for that long!  One leg began to cramp, and then the other one joined in as I writhed to the opposite side.  Not an enjoyable experience!  I lay back down and fully stretched before using the combine harvester to pull myself up.  Oh, so classy!

Mile splits (up to mile 27): 12:38, 14:06, 11:03, 11:18, 12:16, 15:11, 10:48, 11:06, 10:47, 12:09, 10:29, 15:35, 17:49, 12:46, 12:38, 14:46, 10:32, 18:57, 13:18, 16:44, 14:40, 14:22, 13:59, 14:31, 13:05, 11:05, 15:23

…I had intended on writing this recap in just one post, but as I’m at a 2000 word count already, with still so much to say, why break a tradition?!  I’ll split this post into two!…

0-50 in 6 months

This coming Saturday I’m entered to run the South Downs Way 50.

Initially aiming for the 100 mile version this year, I sensibly decided to downgrade to the 50 mile entry instead last August.  Way back before Oscar was even close to arriving and when I was still the size of a whale.

33 weeks pregnantIt’s crazy to think that he was six weeks away from being born in that photo taken last August!

Running 100 miles is still very much on my agenda sometime in the future.  Perhaps next year?  Definitely before Oscar starts at school anyway.

I’m going to come straight out and say it – I haven’t trained enough for the 50, and I’m not training anywhere near as much as I would have liked to be training by this point.  I was regularly running 50 miles a week pre-pregnancy.  Lately it’s been somewhere in the 30s, and they aren’t all quality runs as often Oscar has to come with me, or I have to rush back to feed him.

Getting higher mileage in has been made so much easier over the past few weeks though since I’ve been able to take Oscar out in the running buggy.  (If only he had been born a few weeks earlier I would have managed to get a few extra quality training sessions in!)  I went from having to run in the evenings or super early in the mornings (quite often alone and rushed) to being able to head out easily during nap time each day!  As long as it’s not raining that is!

Oscar in the running buggy

Until a baby can fully support their own head, the advice is not to use a running buggy for runs.  This is usually somewhere around the 6 month mark.  Oscar has been sat up, fully supporting his own head from just before 5 months and so I’ve been taking him out for the last few weeks in the buggy, despite him only officially turning 6 months at the start of last week.

Oscar at six months old

My regular running week now looks something like this:

Monday/Tuesday/some Wednesdays – 1-2 hour buggy run during nap time
Wednesday – Nighttime trail run with club (and conversation with real-life talking adults!)
Thursday/Friday – Rest days as I tend to be in Norfolk on these days
Saturday – parkrun with the buggy and occasionally also a short 30 min buggy run in the afternoon
Sunday – long run (usually without the buggy, but sometimes Oscar comes along too)

On days when I don’t take Oscar out in the buggy I tend to take him out on a long walk in his baby carrier.  I feel that it’s important for him to get lots of fresh air during the day and I swear it helps him to get a better night’s sleep too.  It also means I’m getting more time-on-feet and whilst carrying extra weight as well.  Bonus!

The training run I’ve struggled with the most just lately has actually been the Sunday run.  It’s hard to commit to weekend club long runs as they require me to ensure I feed Oscar at just the right time before leaving and to have expressed for Dan to feed him whilst I’ve gone.  If I run out with the buggy or on my own then I also end up feeling guilty for taking Oscar away from Dan when he could be spending time with him on his day off.  I’ve run a few 10-11 milers during the weekdays to make up for poor Sunday runs – either on a trail night (running to the club trail run starting point and back again afterwards) or out with the buggy.

Oscar and I with the running buggy

I was in very good shape (for me!) the year before I fell pregnant.  I fell pregnant at the end of December 2015, and that year I had PBd in 5k, 5m, 10k, 8.1m, 15k, marathon, 35m and 70m.  I was definitely going out on a high!

I have no idea what I would have been capable of running 50 miles in back then.  I ran the first 50 miles of the 70 in 12h 22m 46s, but running 50 miles of a lapped 70 mile event and a point-to-point 50 mile race are two very different things.  There is a 13 hour cut-off at the SDW on Saturday that I’d like to think I am capable of achieving.

I feel so much stronger on the Wednesday night trail runs now than I did before I was pregnant.  Running with the buggy has definitely made me stronger and I notice the extra power I seem to have when I’m not running with the buggy!  A few people have commented on my speed over trail during the past few weeks which has been a nice confidence boost too.

Oscar in the running buggy

I prefer running on the trails, and although the buggy is made to go off-road, there have been several ‘I want to explore that footpath’ moments just recently that have resulted in footpaths like the above – totally unrunnable with a buggy.  There have also been some which have seemed buggy appropriate, only to end in a stile!  So we’ve had to turn around and come back out the way we came again.

Despite my training mileage having been much lower than I would like, I’m not too worried about the distance of the event on Saturday.  My biggest concern about the coming weekend is actually not being able to carry enough supplies to express and store milk on route and to have the time to be able to do so.  For any non-parents, not expressing is not an option as it becomes too painful!

I need to double check the kit list after I hit the publish button on this post as well.  I know I still need to purchase a waterproof jacket to stuff into my kit bag.  As well as hunt out my foil blanket amongst other things.

To make matters more challenging, Oscar has been a bit poorly over the past fortnight and it was suggested by his Health Visitor that I cut dairy products from my diet for a while to see if this improves things.  I’ve replaced cows milk with almond milk in the fridge and chocolate has been banned from passing my lips for the time being.  Thanks for that Oscar…you do know that Easter is coming up?!  I haven’t noticed any changes in Oscar or myself since cutting back on the dairy yet, but it’s not best practice to change my diet so close to race day!

I’m travelling down with another runner on Saturday morning and will be leaving a little after 4am from Northamptonshire.  Good job I’m used to those sleepless nights and early morning starts!  I think I’ll be heading to bed when Oscar goes at 8:30pm the night before!

Ultra runner in training

To sum it up…

– My long runs haven’t really been long.
– I still need to purchase some of the compulsory kit from the kit list.
– I will need to express about seven times whilst I’m away from home.  At least five of those times will be during the race itself.
– Eating limited dairy (i.e. altering my diet) the week before a big event isn’t ideal.
– Race day will begin at 4:10am when I leave my house for the journey to Worthing.

+ I have increased my time-on-feet over the past six months – usually whilst holding on to a baby who forever seems to be getting heavier (17lbs and counting!)
+ I am mentally strong.
+ Sleep deprivation and keeping going on tired are things I just ‘do’ now that I am a Mum.
+ Running with a baby/carrying Oscar in a baby carrier will help prepare me for carrying my race pack (which feels so much lighter than it used to!)
+ I have run regularly on average 4-5 times per week since Christmas and have been out on long walks with the baby carrier on non-running days.

I have no time aims.  I just want to finish the event, six months post-birth, boobs in-tact and not feeling weak.  My last 70 mile event will count as a qualifier if I wanted to run the SDW100 in 2018, but this qualifying event runs out if I don’t attempt the 100 miles before 2019.  The SDW50 on Saturday will count as a qualifier until 2020.

Is running a 50 mile race six months after having a baby possible?  I’ll let you know on Saturday!  Ultramarathons are run using at least 90% mental strength, right?…!

What has been the most undertrained you ever felt before an event?
Have you run along the South Downs before?