Our first family holiday to York

Dan, Oscar and I headed away on our first family holiday to York earlier this month.

Dan, Me and Oscar on holiday in York

When I was younger, every June my parents would bundle my brother and I in the back of a car surrounded by luggage, sandwiches and carrier bags (to act as sick bags) before heading off to the same farmyard cottage in Derbyshire for a week’s holiday.  I loved my family holidays growing up and Dan always spent a similar week with his family when they visited the Isle of Wight in the Summer.

As a family Dan, Oscar and I have been in desperate need of a holiday for several months now.  It feels like Dan and I have barely spent any quality time together since Oscar was born.  The newborn days were a cycle of grasping at sleep whenever we could fit it in and then last year I spent a lot of time traveling over to Norfolk to visit my Mum when she was really poorly.  Since November, I’ve been working nightshifts and so it always seems like one of us is working and the other is looking after Oscar.  Dan and I are never both together at the same time.

We have been trying to stash away some savings this year.  One of my targets for the year was to raise an extra £500 each month.  So far, I’ve been hitting this target really well although more on that another time.  Therefore, in order that we didn’t dig too deeply into our fresh savings we needed to work our holiday travel on a budget.

Our holiday planning began checking our Tesco clubcard account.  When Dan and I first got together (11 years ago tomorrow!) we regularly used our clubcard points for stays away, but with everything that has gone on during the last couple of years we had just been accumulating points, so had quite a few saved up.

We need a suite rather than just a room now that we have Oscar as it means we can put him down to bed at his usual time of 7:30pm and then go into our room and hang out or watch TV until we’re ready to go to bed ourselves.  We ended up booking a very nice suite in York for just £80 from Monday-Thursday including breakfast, using our Tesco points to pay for the rest of our stay.

The hotel was so nice that they even lent us umbrellas for our stay and we were handed three warm chocolate cookies on our arrival.

York holiday - Oscar with a chocolate cookie

I’m pretty sure Oscar enjoyed his first experience of a chocolate cookie!

We also saved money on our trip by transferring some of our clubcard points into £40 of Cafe Rouge vouchers and £40 of Zizzis vouchers so that our dinner was ‘free’ for two of the nights that we stayed.

Oscar’s daily nap tends to fall between 10-11:30am at the moment and so we decided to work around his schedule for our holiday, heading down for an early breakfast each day, letting him nap whilst we showered and packed up his bag for our travels and then heading out on an adventure each afternoon. Me and Oscar at The Shambles in York On our first full day we headed over to the National Railway Museum. Me, Dan and Oscar at the Train museumOscar loves trains at the moment and can often be found pulling out his small train set and shouting out ‘CHOO CHOO!’ as he pushes the train around the track.  Dan treated him to a lovely wooden pull along train from the museum and Oscar has been obsessed with it ever since. Wooden pull along trainWe also visited the Jorvik Viking Centre on one of the days and Oscar enjoyed riding around the exhibition and pointing out all of the animals to us both as the car glided past.  Both Dan and I remembered the Centre as being much larger than it felt this time round.  I’m not sure if that was because we were both much younger and smaller when we visited as children ourselves?!

We also spent time walking along the river and enjoying the parks.  Oscar is obsessed with slides at the moment and we found one park with six slides.  We knew we were onto a winner! Dan and Oscar at the park in York It was so lovely to be able to completely switch off from everything that has been going on and just hang out as a family, making lots of lovely memories together.  I had initially planned to take my trainers along to get some runs in on a couple of the days, but had injured my calf on the Sunday at Milton Keynes Half, so in the end decided that four days without running wasn’t the end of the world and left my trainers at home.  To be honest, I’m glad I did.Oscar and I in York On the last morning, once we had loaded our car up and checked out of the hotel we headed out for the final time along the length of the York Wall.  Umbrellas were required, as there was a light drizzle when we set off.  We had been so lucky up until that point with the weather though with no rain at all.

I have hardly any photographs of me with my Mum from when I was growing up and I really regret not taking the opportunity to snap more shots of us together as I got older. . Now that I’m a Mum myself I’m trying my hardest to ensure that I feature in photos of Oscar as often as possible so that we can share memories of our time together as he grows up. . Here’s a picture of us along the town wall in York last week. It rained constantly on our final lday in the city but armed with a large umbrella it was just so lovely to be able to switch off fully and truly enjoy just spending time with Oscar and Dan. . I’m already thinking about holidays for next year! . #York #Yorkwall #17monthsold #babywearing #familyholiday #littlemoments #mumandson A post shared by Mary (@fromteachertomum) on

Dan and I both agreed that a week-long break is required at least once a year to give us the opportunity to fully switch off and reconnect as a family.  I’m already thinking about plans for our next adventure!

Did your family go away every year when you were growing up?
Where was the last place you went on holiday?
Can you recommend any other lovely areas in the UK to head away on a mini break as a family?

When a race doesn’t go to plan

Last Sunday was the Milton Keynes Running Festival.  An event of 20 mile, half marathon, 10k and 5k distance races all starting from the Xscape Centre in Milton Keynes.

MK half race number

I had entered the event a while back almost on a whim.  I knew I should be halfway into some serious mileage by this point in the build up to the ultras I have coming up for 2018.  I also knew that my half marathon PB is from a very long time ago (December 2013) and was in desperate need of an update.

My training had been going really well since the start of the year, but as always when I intend to race a short distance event I had a few nerves before the start of the race.  A lot of my miles in recent weeks had been treadmill miles due to childcare issues, and I was concerned about transferring my running from a flat, no bumps treadmill to the ups and downs of Milton Keynes redways.  A quick chat on Twitter with some other treadmill runners eased my nerves though, and ultimately I was feeling rather confident with my race plan when I set off for Milton Keynes on Sunday morning.

The plan was to run 9:30mm pace for the first 10 miles, and then if I could, to pick it up to 9mm for the remaining 5k, pushing for those final few miles, finishing somewhere between 2 hours and 2h 5m.  My current PB is 2h 9m 16s.  Just under 10 minute miling which, on paper is so far away from where I feel I actually am at the moment.

I rocked up on my own with a little over an hour before the start, cursing the fact that I hadn’t researched cheaper places to park beforehand as I handed over the £8.32 it cost me to park for four hours by the race start.  A positive being that I was in a car park literally right by the race start though, so there really was no chance of me getting lost trying to find my car again after the race!

I placed myself somewhere between the two hour and two hour ten minute pacer on the start line and planned to constantly check my watch during the first few miles to ensure I was running the pace I had set out to race and not get swept away with people running by too quickly or get stuck behind other runners who had set off too slow.

The gun went.  We all started pretty much on time and my first mile went by spot on as planned in 9 minutes and 30 seconds.  Lots of people from behind where I had started were rushing past me but I stuck to my guns and stayed at the pace I had set out to run.  I ran the second mile in 9m 20s.  With much of the mile either flat or at a slight downhill I struggled to slow any further without feeling like I was ‘braking’ all the time and I didn’t want to end up injured, so leant into the downhill, whilst trying to remain light on my feet.

My third mile went by in 9:41 (so still an average pace of 9:30mm).  Milton Keynes is actually a lovely area to run around.  There are lots of parks and green spaces.  You would never know that you were so close to such a large city.  (It’s not such a lovely area to drive around though.  All the MK roundabouts look the same to me!)

Mile four – 9m 29s.  I was actually feeling nervously excited by this point.  I began to pass by all those people who had raced off at the start in a hurry to get going and had already burnt out too quickly.  I was definitely going to smash my PB.  I felt so strong and the pace felt so easy.  I knew there were still nine miles to go, but I had never run a race before where the pace I started out at was so conserved and still felt so easy after four miles.

Mile five – still going strong.  The top of my left calf started to feel a little tight and I silently vowed to get the foam roller and compression socks out as soon as I got home that night, trying not to think any more about it.

Within metres of the five mile marker pain shot through the top of my calf and ground me to a complete halt.  I desperately tried to flex my leg before setting off at a jog again only to collapse back into a slump as I realised I could no longer run using that leg.  Glancing at my watch in despair, seeing the average pace creep up I hurriedly took myself to the side of the path where I fully stretched out my left leg, desperate for it to let me run the final miles of the race.

I let a few tears trickle down my face when I realised my leg wasn’t going to let me run and a few more fell as I watched my average pace creep up into the 10s.  I rang Dan, upset and angry that the race hadn’t gone to plan, and so desperate for him to give me some magic words of advice to get my leg working again.

He didn’t have any.  And neither did the running friend I chose to ring to cry to about my bodged race attempt, whilst seeing my watch now display an 11mm average pace.  But they did both calm me down and make me realise that this wasn’t my goal race, – that much better any problems rise now, before my goal race so that I could deal with them before they became an issue.

I was limping along the side of the path whilst I tried to ease the pain in my calf.  I wanted to smack every spectator who shouted in an attempt to get me to carry on running (although I do realise they thought they were probably being encouraging) but on the flip side I was so touched by the amount of runners who came past and genuinely asked me if I was OK.  One guy offered me paracetamol, another a spare layer, and several shared words of ‘Tough Luck’ or something to that effect.

By mile six I realised that I would be silly to try and hobble a further seven miles to the finish so stopped to ask a marshal the quickest way to get to the finish line.  He told me that I could either turn around and go back the way I had come, or continue the way I was going.  I figured that at least if I continued the way I was going then I would get a goodie bag containing food at the finish, so traipsed on.

Next panic: I rang Dan to fret that I wouldn’t have enough time on my parking ticket.  I had only gotten four hours from the time I arrived, and with some quick calculations I realised that I would be coming in somewhere around three hours for the half marathon that afternoon.

As Dan was calming me for the second time that morning I overheard a man wearing a 20 mile bib telling a woman that he was hoping to pull at the next marshal point and that he would not be completing the full distance that day.  I ended my conversation with Dan and joined in with the conversation the runners were having, sharing the information that had been given to me by the marshal I had spoken to.  This man (never learnt his name!) lived not too far from me and was honest in saying that he hadn’t put in the training to run 20 miles.  He was suffering with a painful stomach and had done too little, too late when it came to trying to fix it.  I fell into step beside him and having someone to chat to made miles 7-10 go by a whole lot quicker than the 45 minutes it took us to walk.

The guy I was walking with hoped to be able to run the final 5k of his race, so once we reached the 10 mile mark we thanked each other, wished each other well and I saw him run off into the distance.  My leg had begun to ease a little by now and I was able to pick up the pace to a faster walk, completing my 11th mile in just over 13 minutes.  It’s quite satisfying to know that even if it gets to the point where running is no longer an option during the later miles of my 100 in June, I still have a fairly fast walking stride so won’t lose as much time as some by dropping down to a walking pace.

I decided to try and lightly jog the final couple of miles left to the finish, stopping to walk any hills (as these were pretty much impossible without a great deal of discomfort).  (11:10, 11:02)  I passed the guy I had walked with earlier somewhere around mile 12.

The start of the thirteenth mile is on a horrible, horrible uphill slope.  I’d walked it before when traveling between the two Milton Keynes parkruns on the New Year’s Day Double.  I made a point of lightly jogging my way up this time though.  On my toes so as not to stretch my calf to breaking point.  I didn’t need to prove myself to anybody!

500 metres left until the finish after the horrible hill and my leg was feeling a fair bit loser.  I was gliding past other runners – many of whom were walking by this point.  I knew that my leg wasn’t right though and the finish line couldn’t come quick enough!

MK half marathon finish(Image from here)

The commentator shouted out my name as I approached the finish which was a nice touch and I crossed the line to collect my goodies.  Rather disappointed to be given just a banana along with my medal though – I don’t even like bananas!  (It didn’t go to waste…Oscar happily munched on it for dessert later that evening.)

MK half banana and medal

Side note: I find it rather creepy that Strava knows the exact location I took the above picture as shown below in my Strava screenshot…

Strava map of MK Running Festival half marathon

Chip time: 2:50:42
Position: 1387/1436
Gender position:
570/607
Category position (SF):
223/240

I drove home in a grumpy fed-up, feeling-sorry-for-myself state.  Sunday was Mother’s Day and the afternoon before Dan, Oscar and I had been down to the churchyard where my Mum was buried to add flowers to her grave.  She would have been the first person I rang on the way home from the race to have a whinge to and provide a guaranteed pick-me-up.

Mum's grave and Mother's Day flowers

The ground still hasn’t settled enough for us to be able to have a headstone fitted, so Mum’s grave still displays just a standard wooden name cross.

Oscar insisted on choosing a flower from the bunch I had bought for the grave which he then walked around the graveyard holding, smelling from time to time.  Mum would have loved that he wanted to be a part of it all and, as we left, he placed the flower on top of the mound of earth that marks her grave.  Almost as if he knew that’s where he should place it.Oscar at Mum's graveRunning wise, I’m OK.  I feared the worst initially, but a four day family holiday with lots of walking followed by a trip to the physio this morning has actually done me the world of good and I feel refreshed both mentally and physically.  I’ve got some exercises to work on from the physio but essentially I’ve been given the all-clear to continue running high mileage and high volume, just not to include speedwork or hills for the time being, with a follow-up physio visit scheduled for just before Easter.

Milton Keynes Marathon and South Downs Way 100 remain firmly in the calendar.  As does South Downs Way 50, which is in just 3 weeks time.

Bring it on!

Have you ever pulled from or walked a large portion of a race before?
Did you choose flowers for your Mother on Mother’s Day?

 

Why I love my Out ‘n’ About Nipper Sport running buggy

It was always going to be the case that I purchased a running buggy.

Out 'n' About Nipper Sport V4

Despite saying during pregnancy that I thought I probably wanted to keep running as my ‘me time’ during the week, having a running buggy makes it so much more practical to fit runs in since Oscar arrived and it helps me remain a regular attendee at parkrun on a Saturday morning.

When Oscar was just a few weeks old, a friend from my running club told me about Wendy from Running Buggies coming to Stanwick Lakes the following week.  She was going to be demonstrating some of the different running buggies that her business sold and be on hand to offer advice to buggy runners.

I think it might have been my very first trip out on my own with Oscar in the car at that point, and I still had no clue what I was doing as a Mum with a new baby (do we ever really know?!) but I was determined to get to Stanwick Lakes, just 2 miles up the road and a regular running haunt for me – as I felt it would be so helpful to view the buggies in person and to be able to chat to other Mums as well as Wendy, who had a wealth of knowledge about the different buggies available.

The day before the event I messaged to say that I would be going along and Wendy asked what my requirements were in a buggy.  I told her that I would mainly be running short distances with the buggy – plenty of parkruns and runs around an hour in length, including some off road running.  The buggy wouldn’t be used for town trips, but would potentially also be used for weekend walks in the countryside.

The two buggies which she suggested I try out that (very cold) Friday morning were the Thule Glide and the Out ‘n’ About Nipper Sport V4.  Both would be suitable for my requirements, with the Out ‘n’ About weighing in slightly heavier and the Thule sporting a larger price tag.

Thule Glide and the Out n About Nipper Sport V4Wendy helpfully held Oscar for me (and found an extra blanket to wrap him in as I was totally unprepared for the chilly wind that was raging that morning!) so that I may run along the track (childless!) and test out each of the two buggies.

Although I didn’t purchase a buggy immediately following that visit, I took sets of information packs home with me to weigh up my options and check my bank balance ready for the day I inevitably did purchase a buggy.

Had it not been for Wendy putting on an event I wouldn’t have known where to begin when it came to testing out running buggies or knowing the difference between all the makes and models.  Where do you go to try out a running buggy?!  I had assumed that all three wheeled buggies were suitable for running and in all conditions, but that is not the case at all.

It is recommended that you do not run with a baby in a buggy, even a dedicated running buggy, until they are at least six months old and capable of holding their own head up confidently.  Similar to the time that you are confident in placing them in a high chair at the table with you for dinner.

Just before Oscar turned six months old I spoke to Wendy again.  She was headed back up to my side of the country and offered to bring along a couple of buggies for me to try out now that I would be able to test them out with Oscar as passenger.  I thanked her for her kind offer but had already decided to invest in the Out ‘n’ About Nipper by this point, so headed over to her website to make my purchase.

And I haven’t looked back!

Oscar and I with the running buggy

Having my own running buggy has been great for so many reasons, mainly:

  • I can easily take Oscar out on walks so that we may both enjoy the fresh air along bridleways and footpaths – some tracks which a regular buggy would not be able to cope with.
  • I can fit in runs during the daytime when I’m a lone parent, or during weeks when Dan is working away from home and I otherwise would not be able to run.
  • I can run Oscar to sleep on all those days when he refuses to take a nap!

Some of the features of the Out ‘n’ About Nipper Sport I have found really useful are:

  • Great suspension
    • When Oscar was about 3 or 4 months old I liked to take him out for a walk every day in his day-to-day buggy.  I vividly remember walking along a wide rocky gravel track and Oscar crying so much from the movement of the buggy that I ended up picking him up and placing him on my shoulder to calm him, whilst awkwardly pushing the heavy buggy along with my other hand.  I regularly run down this gravelly track now with my Out ‘n’ About buggy whilst Oscar snores away inside!
      Oscar and I at Wimpole Estate parkrun
  • Handbrake
    • Alongside the handlebar is a handbrake.  I always make sure to have my hand close to this when running downhill!
      Out 'n' About Nipper Sport running buggy
  • Safety strap
    • Sliding my hand through this strap when running gives me piece of mind that if I trip or stumble, the buggy and Oscar aren’t going to continue rolling out into the road, or into potential danger.  Instead, the buggy will stay by my side (and hopefully help to keep me upright should I trip too!)
  • Undercarriage storage
    • There is a fair amount of storage underneath the buggy for items you might need on a run or space for a mini food shop after an emergency run to the shops!  (If you push the sun visor up, it does a great job of holding a french stick in place too I discovered!)
      French stick in the running buggy
  • Top pockets alongside the visor
    • These are great for holding my phone and keys when I run, so that they’re easy to grab should I need them.
  • The adjustable back
    • Although Oscar could sit up unaided from about five months old, I still always made sure to place an array of cushions behind him when he was on the floor during the early days, as he wasn’t always that stable!  The back of the Out ‘n’ About Nipper can be adjusted so that it reclines and this is how I used it when we first started out running together.  Now that Oscar is older, he wants to be able to see where he’s going all the time so I’ve adjusted the back to a more upright position.
      Oscar at March parkrun
  • It’s Lightweight (9.8kg)
    • Following my Caesarean, when Dan returned to work I remained housebound for several weeks as I could not lift or turn the original buggy we owned.  The difference in weight between that buggy and the running buggy is very noticeable, and I am able to hold the Out ‘n’ About easily with just one hand.
      Out 'n' About Nipper Sport running buggy - lightweight
  • Adjustable handlebar
    • I’m fairly tall so have the handlebar set at it’s highest setting.  My friend Jenny is much shorter than me and when I was unable to collect Oscar from nursery one day last Summer she was able to adjust the handlebar so that pushing the buggy became more comfortable for her.
  • 16″ wheels
    • Every non-runner comments on the size of these!
      Oscar in the running buggy
  • Fixed front wheel
    • This takes some getting used to.  My brother still complains that he finds it impossible to push Oscar’s running buggy when out on a walk, but it’s really not difficult when you’re used to it.  All running buggies should have fixed wheels.  If you were running along with a regular buggy which has front wheels which twist and your front wheel hit a large stone, causing the wheel to twist quickly to the side you could soon end up heading into the road, or into other runners if you were at a parkrun or race.  When turning a buggy with a fixed wheel, the way to change direction is to lightly put pressure on the handlebar at the back of the buggy, resulting in the (very light) front wheel lifting from the ground.  You can then angle the buggy in the direction you want to be headed before returning the front wheel to the ground again.
      Sounds complicated and slow, but very quick easy after a few tries.
  • Easy to use foot brake
    • The foot brake is located at the back of the buggy and is bright red, so impossible to miss.  It’s a quite large plastic flap, which is really easy to push down and up again when you want to remove the brake to continue on with your journey.
  • Ease of fitting in a car boot
    • I choose to leave the back seats down on one side in my car, meaning I can literally just throw the buggy into the back of the car and drive off when I want to head out, with the buggy ready to go as soon as I arrive at my destination.  If we travel in Dan’s car, Dan likes to keep the buggy within his boot, but it takes just seconds to unscrew and pop off the front wheel, meaning that it easily fits widthways in the back of his car.
  • Super rain cover
    • I’ve had to use the rain cover a few times whilst out on a run now and found the cover so quick and easy to throw over the buggy.  There is a large velcro strip which runs along the back of the cover, and two sets of poppers which attach around the front wheel support to keep the cover in place.  Oscar sleeps through the whole thing!
      Out 'n' About Nipper Sport running buggy with raincoverOut 'n' About Nipper Sport running buggy with raincover
  •  Breathable back panel
    • Not only does this mean that the buggy doesn’t become so stuffy in the hot Summer months, but it also helps to make the buggy more aerodynamic when you want to pick up some speed.
      Out 'n' About Nipper Sport running buggy with Oscar
  • The viewing pane
    • Very handy to spot when Oscar is falling asleep, or when he is munching on falling leaves he shouldn’t have in there with him!
      Oscar in the running buggy

You can also buy footmuffs for the buggy, which look super snug, but I love this blanket which my friend crocheted for Oscar not long after he was born.  It’s super colourful and you can definitely see us coming on a run!
Northampton parkrun with the buggy

So what does Oscar think?  I’m pretty sure he loves it.  He spends most parkruns waving madly at people as we run by.  Just recently he’s also added the phrase “Bye bye” to the wave.  I really hope that nobody thinks I’m sarcastically commenting on the fact that we’re passing them, and instead realise that it is my child waving and commenting as we run by!

End of year round up

One of the things I love most about blogging is the ability to look back at the end of the year and reminisce over everything I’ve done across the past twelve months.  This year has been a bit of a tough one for several reasons, and so not everything has made it to the blog, but I still managed to scrape together 45 posts during 2017.  I’m hoping to have a number a little higher than that for the coming year though as things hopefully start to settle down a little once more.

My 2017bestnine from Instagram:

2017bestnine - A Healthier Moo

Medals, races and mud…that’s what we like to see! 😉

I actually started posting a few images up on a separate Instagram account this year (fromteachertomum) so that I would be able to share a few select images of Oscar’s adventures and Mum life without drowning my AHM fitness account with baby.  Just for fun, here’s my 2017bestnine from that account as well:

2017bestnine - From Teacher to MumHe has been a lovely little addition to our family.

January:

For the second year in a row I kicked off the New Year with a double parkrun, along with several other members from my running club.  In 2016 I had run Huntingdon parkrun followed by Peterborough which was one of only a few options of double day parkruns near to us at the time.  Word obviously got around though, because at the start of this year we had more to choose from and so I made the decision to head over to Milton Keynes to run the Linford Wood parkrun course, followed by a jog over for the Milton Keynes route a little later, and then a jog back to my car back at the first course again.

Milton Keynes parkrun on New Year's Day

In the New Year Oscar started attending swimming lessons at a local pool in Wellingborough.  He was an avid hater of bath time up until this point but he absolutely adores his swimming lessons.  Other than the 8 weeks where I returned to work in the Summer term, he has been going weekly for a swimming lesson and can now get in and out of the pool safely and easily, kicks and moves his arms to swim and blows bubbles in the water.  He usually gets really excited when he realises we’ve arrived at the swimming pool and one of my favourite times at the pool was when the instructor got us all to lay the babies on a tilted hand float so that their legs were dangling in the water and then whoosh them around the pool alongside us like they were paddling on a surf board.  Oscar thought this was amazing and shrieked so loudly and for so long as he was so excited!  He absolutely loves being in the pool.  A proper little water baby!

Dan made the jump from working in IT development within schools during January to managing IT systems within a Nationwide Solicitor firm.  With a new baby and a three month job probation to pass we debated for quite a while before Dan eventually made the leap, but it was a great decision and not only is he very happy in his new role but he is now working much closer to home, leaving much later in the morning for work and bringing home more money.  Much better all round!

I ran the final cross-country race of the season at Sharnbrook this month.

Sharnbrook cross-country trail

Dan ran the final Tough Mudder in Perton, Wolverhampton, which is the town his parents live in.

Dan at the end of Tough MudderIt’s not something that wildly appeals to me to be honest, but Dan really enjoyed it!

February:

I started to realise that fitting in runs around a new baby would be more difficult than I first thought(!)

I ran my first half marathon post baby at my club’s inaugural Welly Trail Races event.

Welly Trail races

March:

I had managed to enter the Hunny Bell Cross-country race held a couple of miles from my parents’ house in time to get a spot and so enjoyed a cross-country event outside of the Three Counties League I usually run with during the Winter months.  Both my parents were also able to see me finish a race, which was a first for my Mum.

Hunny Bell XC finish

I finally got round to ordering Oscar’s running buggy.  Something I had been avoiding until he was old enough to go in it, but something I knew I would order all along! 😉

Oscar in the running buggy

I had been lucky enough to win a Valentine’s Photoshoot on Facebook and so a couple of weeks into March we persuaded my friend Laura to push Oscar around Harlestone Firs in his buggy so that Dan and I could have some nice pictures taken.  There aren’t any photos of just Dan and I together from our wedding that I really like, but Maxine at Do You Realise? photography was an amazing photographer and she captured some lovely photographs for us to get printed.

Do You Realise photography couple shoot at Harlestone Firs

Dan and I sat down one weekend (after many many afternoons of talking about it) and worked out our living costs, realising that I would be able to leave my job as a teacher in order to bring Oscar up myself, rather than put him into a nursery full time, – and so I handed my notice in at school.

April:

I had entered The South Downs Way 50 before Oscar had even been born.  I wanted a big challenge to work towards as part of my return to running post-baby, and I definitely got that with running 50 miles!  Going into the race I definitely hadn’t completed enough training, but I was so, so ecstatic to finish well within the cut off times, and as strongly as I did despite having to stop on route to pump(!)

South Downs Way 50 medal

The following weekend, Dan, Oscar and I headed to Shropshire for a well-deserved weekend away in a lovely little cottage with friends.  We even managed to fit in some parkrun tourism at Ludlow parkrun whilst we were there!

Ludlow parkrun with Dan, John and Lynn

I made it down to London for my annual trip with friends to cheer runners along the marathon route.

Then I had my first weekend away from Oscar when I ran the Pembrokeshire marathon at the end of the month.

WDAC at Pembrokeshire marathon

May:

May was a good month running-wise.  I ran the Silverstone 10k in a quicker-than-hoped time, the Rugby 6 to a new PB and Corby 5 in a course PB, all as part of the East Midlands Grand Prix series.

Silverstone 10k

May was also the month where I returned to work full time (albeit only for one day before the start of the half term holiday).

June:

I ran Shires and Spires 35m for the fourth time at the start of this month, but as I returned to work the following day I never got round to writing a recap of the event.

Shires and Spires 35m medal

Oscar officially started nursery when I returned to school after the half term break.  Dan had my first week back booked as holiday from work in case there were any problems with Oscar in nursery during the day time, but all seemed to go well.  Dan spent most of the week making much-needed improvements on our house to ready it for guests we had staying in the Summer.

I had my name in print in Your Fitness magazine this month.

Your Fitness magazine

I ran the remaining races of the EMGP series.  The Harborough 5, Weedon 10k (to a course PB) and then Milton Keynes 10k to a full on new PB!

Milton Keynes 10k

I headed over with Oscar in his buggy to photograph our club runners at the Colworth Marathon Challenge on the Friday evening.  I’m hoping to be able to run the full three-day event again in 2018.

Sally and Jo at Colworth 5m

 

July:

I managed to type up (over several days!) a new Day-in-the-life post of a full-time-working-training-for-a-marathon-new-Mum.

Oscar tea

I had great fun swinging round the treetops for a friend’s hen do at Woburn, followed by some tasty afternoon tea.

Afternoon tea for Steph's hen do

I managed to gain a new 5 mile PB at our club annual pre-Welly 5 BBQ run, and then marshaled for the actual Welly 5 the following weekend.

Welly 5 winnersAt some point during the month of July, I was persuaded to stay on an extra month in September at school, due to lack of staff.  So luckily, I never had to give a leaving speech at the end of year assembly!  😉

August:

We attended our first wedding as a family of three, where Dan was also an usher.

Sarah and Treble's wedding - Oscar in bracesAnd I was outraged when somebody threw eggs at me from a car window whilst I was out on a run in Norfolk.  :(

We had a really busy August in fact.  I had been travelling back to Norfolk to spend time with my parents each week from February-time as neither of them were very well.  Somehow we managed to fit in a wedding in Birmingham, a first birthday party in Norwich and another first birthday party in Huddersfield over the Summer.  The two birthday parties even fell on the same weekend!

Dinosaur cake for Charles' birthday at the Dinosaur Park

We did manage to escape to Rutland Water for a few days for our third wedding anniversary though which was nice.

And we finally had carpet laid in all the upstairs rooms and on the stairs and landing.  I was so excited to finally see carpet down on the floor!

Oscar's nursery bedroom

September:

As I was looking back through my blog posts just now I realised that I didn’t blog at all during September!  It was a very busy time though.  Working as a teacher during the month of September is very different to the month of June, when half the students have already finished for the year and lots of kids are out on school trips.  Not only was I super busy with work this month but we had something planned in the calendar for every single weekend.

The first weekend was spent marshaling at Northampton half marathon where I was once again sector lead of the Great Houghton section.  For the fourth year I believe now?

The second weekend, I went to my friend Steph’s wedding.

Me and Laura at Steph's weddingShe had the best photo challenge, which Laura and I totally smashed and won!

Photo challenge at Steph's wedding

Our new sofas arrived!  The first time I have ever bought brand new sofas before and it was rather exciting!

New sofas in the lounge

I headed back to Norfolk to take part in the Round Norfolk Relay event.  Our club managed to find two teams of runners and crew and it was an awesome weekend that I can’t wait to take part in again next year!

Stage 5 of the Round Norfolk Relay

The evening after the RNR I had returned home to get some school work sorted out ready for work the following week.  The following day my Dad rang to say that my Mum had been admitted into hospital.  At this point (four years since being diagnosed with terminal cancer) this was no longer an uncommon occurrence and I asked Dad to keep me updated, saying that I would return the following weekend to visit her in hospital, or at home again, as she had so often ended up in hospital for just a couple of days at a time.

I finished school at 3pm on the Wednesday and it was only a matter of seconds after the final bell had gone when my Dad rang my mobile to say that I needed to get over to Norwich then.  That Mum was really bad this time and that doctors had given her just 48 hours.  After a call to Dan so that he could arrange to leave work early to pick up Oscar from nursery that evening I rushed off over to Norwich hospital and it wasn’t a very nice visit at all.  It was rather scary in fact.

I was supposed to be running Ealing half marathon the following weekend, but obviously this did not happen, and instead I spent the weekend at the Norfolk and Norwich hospital, as well as visiting several nights after work during the week.

It all ended up being a bit much and by the end of the month I had made myself very ill from the night feeds, school work, housework and constant travelling.  I spent the last two days of term laying in bed feeling pretty useless.  Made even more miserable due to the fact that I had really been looking forward to the Decathlon ambassador event I had been invited to but which now had to miss, and the fact that I was so poorly I couldn’t even hold Oscar on his first birthday.

Oscar's first birthday

October:

We held a birthday party for him the weekend after his birthday and had him Christened.  I was able to get up and about and put a face on, but I still wasn’t very well at all.

Mabel and MarthaMabel and Martha, checking out the Godmother gift their Mum was given!  (They have their own Instagram here if you want to check it out!)

As I had finished school by October I was then travelling back to Norfolk for four days a week.  After two weeks in hospital, at my Mum’s request, the doctors let her return home where she remained in a hospital bed in the lounge for the remaining weeks.  I usually headed back Monday afternoon-Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday.  A minimum of 12 extra hours in the car each week but often more than this due to roadworks and bad traffic.

Several of my visits were spent taking my parents’ dog Blue out for long walks and helping out with the shopping and cooking.

Oscar and Blue out on a walk

I was lucky enough to be chosen as an ambassador for Milton Keynes Marathon this month, which takes place in May 2018.  I can’t wait to run the marathon for the fourth time!

Milton Keynes Marathon ambassador

I had planned to target and run Chelmsford marathon in October for a sub 4h 30m, but this obviously went out of the window as I hadn’t been able to get enough miles in during the build up to race day and I had been suffering with a bad back for several weeks.  It was probably the toughest marathon I’ve run by the end of the race, and I’ve run several off-road events!

Chelmsford marathon mile 25

November:

November went by in a bit of a blur.  I headed to Gower with friends for the EnduranceLife Coastal Marathon as per usual, and the break was very much needed.

EnduranceLife Gower marathon 2017

The following week Dan was working away in Dublin, but I barely knew about it as I was hardly home anyway.

The last Wednesday of the month when I was visiting Mum Oscar bent down to kiss her for the first time and happily did his usual wave and “Bye bye” babble to her as we left.  She had been a little confused during our visit but we’d had several chats throughout the day.  That was the last time we spoke.

I visited the following Saturday for several hours but she was asleep the whole time, and when I rang Dan to say that I had finished running the Dunstable XC the following morning he told me that my Dad had been on the phone not long earlier to let him know that my Mum had just died.
Dan’s Nan had died hours earlier following a heart attack and we lost another family member to cancer later that week.  (A third to cancer in 2017 just yesterday.)

December:

After putting it off for the past few years I ran Bedford half marathon and was pleasantly surprised at my time considering how inconsistent my training had been in the build up to the race.

Bedford half marathon

Most of the week had been working with my Dad on preparations for my Mum’s funeral.  She had been very definite about what she wanted, but there was a lot we were unable to put into place until she died.

The day after the funeral I began a new job working nightshifts at a large Tesco supermarket.  It’s not a forever thing, but the extra money will be handy to restock savings.

My brother and Dad came up to mine for a visit one evening so that I could attend the annual Running Club Christmas awards ceremony.

Running club Christmas do 2017

I came home marginally cleaner following the annual Christmas Eve run this year.

Christmas Eve muddy run

And then spent Christmas day in Norfolk with my side of the family.

2013 round up * 2014 round up * 2015 round up * 2016 round up

How would you sum up your 2017?
What have you been up to this year?