Balancing toddler, runner and wife life

Yesterday was my fourth wedding anniversary.

Fourth anniversary roses

Some beautiful roses turned up for me during the day.  In fact I was out when they arrived so I had to nip next door and collect them from my neighbour.
They’re beautiful.  Got myself a good one!

Four years in anniversaries is fruit and flowers.  Dan doesn’t like any fruits…at all.  And flowers aren’t really his thing either, but for a while now we’ve been on about getting a plant for our lounge to complete the look.  I managed to sneakily collect and hide a massive plant in our office on Wednesday.  Dan never goes into our office apart from the rare occasion when he works from home.  But when I returned from my run on Wednesday evening I spotted the light on in the office.  Apparently he had been returning wrapping paper and scissors to the desk.  (Neither of which belong in our office…does anyone else have a partner who still doesn’t know where half the stuff belongs in your house?!)  When questioned he earnestly told me that he hadn’t spotted anything out of the ordinary in the office at all to the point that I believed him.

Although I’m rather concerned about how unobservant he is…

Hidden plant for our anniversary

He was rather pleased with it when he came down and found it in the lounge yesterday morning and it seems to suit our room.

Indoor plant for the loungeThe picture we have on our wall is from our Babymoon back in 2016.  The rain absolutely hammered down across that bridge on one of the days we were in Prague and we got caught out crossing without an umbrella, although there were hundreds of others dashing by with brightly coloured umbrellas up.  The print is very similar to a black, white and red print we purchased on our honeymoon in 2014 which we have displayed on the other long wall in our lounge to match.

We went out for a family meal last night to celebrate.  Oscar really enjoyed his hummus dipping pot!

This time four years ago I had only run four marathons and a couple of ultras.  Now my marathon total sits at thirteen with almost as many ultras.

Lots has happened over the course of the last four years, but our biggest change has obviously been having Oscar.  Thinking back I really wish Dan and I had taken full advantage of the time we had to ourselves before having Oscar, but at the same time I’m so glad we had him when we did.  (Although I absolutely wouldn’t have been ready for the responsibility any sooner!)

If you’ve read my blog for a while now you’ll know that I often struggle with taking too much on, and it’s usually me that ends up losing out.  Be it through sleep or stress.

I'll sleep when I'm dead

Despite getting very limited sleep each week I’m actually doing OK at the moment, but I can feel the pressure bubbling up again.  I dream of having lazy weekends or evenings sitting in front of the TV as a family but in all honesty, if I spot a free day I instantly fill it with an activity or housework and I’m not even sure how to turn our TV on!

Because of the age Oscar is at, it seems that just as we settle into a routine, it changes again and since the start of the Summer I haven’t been able to count on him being asleep in bed by a certain time.  Luckily, Dan has taken over the bedtime routine and it’s given me a chance to crack on with housework, or get out for a quick 10k if my body was feeling too tired for an early morning run that morning.

Late night runningI much prefer running in the morning just lately.  Even though the 5am alarms are a killer on a couple of hours sleep it’s so nice to have gotten my run in and be showered by the time Dan leaves for work at 7:50am.  It doesn’t always go to plan though…I’d scheduled a long run in for Tuesday morning of this week, but Oscar woke minutes after I did and called out for me to go to him.  He didn’t settle and ended up getting up for the day, meaning not only had I only had four hours sleep that night, but I wouldn’t be able to get to bed early that evening as I would still need to slot in a run of some description when it got dark.  I switched out my long run for a 10k instead though.

Although I might perhaps come across as shy to some people who don’t know me very well I actually really like to have people around most of the time.  Something which isn’t really talked about is just how isolating staying home with a child can feel at times.  I absolutely love being home with Oscar and getting to spend these days with him, but being so far away from family and close friends, Dan working late five days a week and having a season ticket for Wolverhampton Wanderers again this year, with the new season starting this weekend (meaning he will spend the day away most Saturdays too), my week can sometimes feel very samey and lonely.

I am really enjoying running at the moment and my base fitness is probably near to the best it’s ever been – with lots of regular running, walking carrying a toddler and strength work.  But I’m really struggling mentally with getting out to run my long runs.  I’ve always completed the majority of my long training runs with friends in the build up to events, but that’s become a lot harder to do this year as I am so specific about when I can get out to run.  I haven’t been able to run at the weekends as I’ve been working throughout the night so would be running long on no sleep, when I really need to be catching up on a little sleep ready for the following night-shift.  I’ve been able to get a couple of early morning slightly longer runs in with another runner from my club who was attempting the Centurion Grand Slam of 4x 100 milers this year (although unfortunately DNFd at the third event – the North Downs Way 100 – last weekend) but other than that the majority of my runs have been between 5-10 miles in length, with a few closer to 15 miles.  I really need to book a marathon or longer distance in for the end of the Summer, but once again it’s hard to organise around work/life events now that we have Oscar and I work weekends.

I used to be able to whack in my earphones and listen to a few podcasts to get me round a long run if I was running it alone, but now that nearly all of my runs in the week are run alone and I also work one or two nine hour nightshifts each weekend in an aisle on my own listening to back-to-back episodes of a podcast, listening to a podcast and spending a few more hours on my own doesn’t have quite the same appeal anymore!  I now spend most of my runs feeling that I should be back with my family (if running during the daytime) or all the things I should be catching up on back at home!

I’m currently putting off this morning’s long run.  I just need to man up and get out there I guess.  Just wish I had someone to run out with me!

Do you prefer running on your own or with others?
Any podcast recommendations?  I’ve listened to a lot and am running out!
Are you a morning or evening runner?

Changing tactics for attempt number 2

I recapped my South Downs Way 100 mile attempt in my last post.  Frustratingly I didn’t complete the distance but I have already entered another 100 mile race in order to have another shot at it.  I will complete 100 miles!

Interestingly I posted a poll on Twitter at the end of last week.  Results below:

So I’m not alone in not completing 100 miles the first time round.

I recently read a quote from Cat Simpson on the Centurion Running website where she spoke about having the confidence to run the Grand Union Canal Race after knowing her body could continue moving past the length of a day, having completed her first 100 mile event in 25 hours.  (She has since gone on to complete 100 milers in a mere 17 hours.  Insane!)

A couple of points:

1 – I can only ever dream of running that fast

2 – I never want to run the GUCR!

3 – Whilst on the Centurion website just now I spotted Robbie Britton’s 100 mile winning time of 15h 47m at the SDW in 2013.  The pro ultra runners don’t have to deal with sleep deprivation at all!

I have bit the bullet and entered the Robin Hood 100 mile race in September.  (64 days away.)  It has very similar rules to SDW in terms of pacing/crew, the same time limit (30 hours) and is a much flatter course on more runnable terrain.  Dan and I have friends living nearby who have agreed to put Dan and Oscar up for the weekend so that they can come out to support me.  (Although I do fear for their two rabbits who Oscar is currently obsessed with.  Not sure the pair of them could put up with a very excitable toddler in love with ‘hop hop bunnies’ for a whole weekend!)
There will be live tracking at the event and I’ll share the link closer to race day.

I also have an amazing team of friends who have offered their services to pace and crew for the day.  I really would not be able to even think about completing this kind of distance without the help I have been offered and it really means so much to me that friends have such high faith in my abilities.  I promise to do my best not to let anyone down.

It would be silly for me to have run 78 miles of the South Downs Way, decide to pull from the event and then rock up to the next one having not taken anything away from the day, so below I’ve tried to pull everything I could from my first experience and commented realistically as to if it worked or if I could have improved things in that area.

Sleep:

This has to come first on my list because I feel like it was my biggest downfall in the build up to the race.  So often sleep or diet are the forgotten ingredients when training and this has very much been the case with me this year.  My sleep has been shocking and I genuinely do not know how I have existed most weeks.  In the build up to race day I was working three night shifts a week – 10pm-7am, followed by one hour of sleep before acting as sole parent in charge of an active and needy toddler the following day.  The only exception to this has been on Sundays when I would usually manage three hours of sleep followed by shared parental responsibility for the day.  Some evenings I would also manage to cram an extra hour of sleep in before my night shift began and towards the end I discovered that I could also fit in a 35 minute nap in the back of my car during my 1am ‘lunchbreak’ on a shift.  But it’s been far from ideal.
Going forward I have since handed my notice in at my night shift job (although have also now retracted it to work just one night a week when Dan and I weighed up the benefits.  One night a week should hopefully be sustainable going forward whilst also providing us some extra money to add to our savings pot.

The night before my first attempt at the distance I had planned on getting a solid 7-8 hours of sleep, but a late meal out and early bird call resulted in not getting to bed until 11am and waking by 4am the day of the race.  Again, far from ideal.

Food:

I didn’t take enough food with me in my bag for the start of the race so, other than a nakd bar after a couple of miles, and a couple of grabbed sandwiches at the 10 mile checkpoint I had no other food with me until I met with my crew at mile 22.  I need to sit down and properly study the crewpoints for the next race and work out how much food I need to be taking on board between each checkpoint and ensure my bag always remains topped up.

When I first started working nightshifts I struggled with my appetite and eating.  Most of the other people I work with have a cooked meal during our lunchbreak (1am).  I decided against this as I love breakfast too much, and I like Oscar to have somebody to eat his lunch and dinner with each day, rather than have him eat on his own when he is still so young.  However, it would often result in me grabbing a large bar of chocolate/slice of cake midshift to perk me up and get me through when I was feeling exhausted.  I realised that I wasn’t doing myself any favours and having toyed with the idea for a while I switched to a more vegetarian/vegan lifestyle which is suiting me much better.  I’ll write more about my choices and decisions in another post at some point, but basically I’m not strictly vegan, I never choose meat dishes and have substituted a lot of dairy products with alternatives in recent months.  I don’t like the idea of consuming so much processed food.  If I wouldn’t be happy with Oscar consuming it, then I shouldn’t be either.  I’m much happier with my results since the change and have discovered so many great alternative meals as a result.

However, on race day, I knew that chocolate milk works for me and so kept this in as part of my plan.

Chocolate milk and an apple

Pacing:

I actually think that I paced SDW fairly well.  The going was much easier in the first half than I knew it would be in the second half, and in terms of when to run/walk, this is very much dictated for you with the hills and rough terrain.  I think I will have more problems when it comes to pacing when it comes to the Robin Hood event as it is a much, much flatter course.  I think I may need to stick to some kind of regular run/walk method in order to prevent running too hard too early on in the race.  When I ran the Grim 70m a few years ago I tried to stick to running no faster than 12 minute miles and no walking slower than 15 minute miles and that worked well for me, but it was a very different event – 10 mile loops.  The Robin Hood is three loops.  Two of 30 miles and one of 40 miles.

Darkness:

I have no concerns about running in the dark as I’ve always run trail through the night during the Winter months and so this wasn’t an issue on the SDW.  However, there were only 7 hours and 31 minutes of darkness in June compared to the 11 hours and 11 minutes I will have in September.  Although again, this could help prevent me from travelling too fast during the later miles and burning out before the end.

Core:

I worked religiously on my core at the start of the year but as life took over it was something that I neglected.  However, my core was still fairly strong due to the manual nature of my part time job.  Lugging full supermarket cages around a massive store is not for the faint-hearted and for several weeks I was placed on the juice aisle – one of the heaviest sets of cages of all and often working 8-10 cages in a night.  I ensure I walk a minimum of 10,000 steps each day, including a daily walk with Oscar, who I carry when he gets too tired.  We weighed him the other week and he’s two stone now!  I vividly remember my arms aching from carrying him at just a few weeks old when he was less than 7lbs!

Dan, Oscar and I(When Dan carries him, he takes the easy option of carrying him on his shoulders!)

Training:

I ran around 50ish miles a week in the months leading up to SDW100, although often didn’t record all of my treadmill runs on Strava.  I’m planning to run all of my runs outside in the build up to Robin Hood so as to remain accountable and analyse my pace/training a little better.  I took a full week off from training after SDW, and had a couple of easy training weeks before jumping back in with training again but I’m hoping to get back on it again now.  I’ve been out running with others a fair bit over the last couple of weeks and that always makes me feel more enthusiastic about getting out there for extra miles.
I have to be very organised with when I’m planning on running as I have Oscar at home all week.  I have to get up at 5:15am or run late at night around bedtime/Dan’s work or other activities.  I’ll be honest, on the days when I was super exhausted and struggled to get out of bed in the morning I did roll over and go back to sleep.  It’s something I rarely do as I’m such a morning person, but with so little opportunity to sleep this year I’ve really had to grab any chance I could get.  I need to ensure I slot any missed miles back in later in the day/week though as I want to ensure I give myself the absolute best chance of making it round on race day.
I didn’t complete as many speedwork sessions as I would have liked this year, and feel that I could increase my speed further, therefore completing the race sooner and helping to prevent tiredness setting in too early into the race.

My weakness will definitely be my tiredness on race day.  I thought that I would sail through on no sleep with all the experience I have of sleepless nights, but even though my work is very manual it is NOT the same as covering 100 miles on no sleep at all.

What are your stumbling blocks when it comes to training?
Do you analyse events after you have run them?

My first crack at the 100 mile distance

Obviously I’ve left this recap much longer than intended.  A month has already passed since I found myself on the start line for the South Downs Way 100 at the start of June.

I felt so ready and positive on race day, despite the poor sleep leading up to the event.

Oscar decided a fortnight before race day that evenings are for playing and not sleeping.  The week before race day saw me laying on his bedroom floor for hours on end reading book after book and pretending to go to sleep myself countless times in the hope it would encourage him to do the same.  Much later I would often be woken by Dan shaking my shoulder to let me know that Oscar was now finally asleep only for me to then head downstairs to tidy up after the day/slot in my run/collapse on a sofa somewhere.  It was a rather wearing time and didn’t come at the best time for me at all (if there ever is a good time for a toddler not sleeping!)

Nevertheless, I packed (at the last minute, a few hours before setting off on the Friday) and made my way down to Winchester in the passenger seat of Laura’s car vowing to get an early night after a takeaway pizza that evening.

ROAD TRIP!!! We are currently sat on the M40 Southbound on the way to Winchester for the #SDW100 tomorrow morning. . The last six months have been incredibly hard. My Mum dying, working a number of part-time jobs alongside each other and seeing as much of my Dad as possible whilst trying to keep on top of my own housework and raise Oscar in the way that Dan and I feel best. . Training runs have been at 11pm, 4:30am, on no sleep, on the way to weddings, with the buggy and without. . Dan has barely seen me. I’ve barely seen anyone properly and constantly felt like I should be doing something. . BUT tomorrow is my goal race for the year, and the end is in sight at the most draining of my part time jobs. I feel like our house is beginning to come together after needing a complete revamp when we moved a couple of years ago and that will be another big relief when that is complete. . Whatever happens tomorrow I am so grateful that I have been able to make it to the start line and that my friends and husband have been so supportive over the last few months. 😘 . #hopingmybestisgoodenough #runnersontour #runnersofinstagram #fittingitallin #runningmum #mumswhorun #RunMummyRun

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That plan all went to pot when we realised that Kev and Amanda from our club (who were crewing and pacing for the other two Wellingborough runners) were not far behind us on the road and were heading out to Pizza Express for dinner that evening.  Of course we then hung on for them to arrive and park up at Chilcomb Sports Ground and of course we then agreed to amble into town following Kev’s cries of “It’s only a mile away!” (despite a race volunteer telling us town was four miles away and currently gridlocked due to a bomb threat.)

By the time we’d hiked into the town and our pizzas had arrived it was 10pm.  I’d wanted to be in bed by 10pm at the absolute latest, having had a particularly bad night with Oscar the night before, but here I was at 10pm hurriedly chowing down my pizza as fast as possible, knowing that we still needed to hike back to the race startline where we’d left our cars, and drive the 11 miles to check in at our hotel.  It was going to be a long night without a lot of sleep, as we needed to be back at Winchester for the race briefing by 5:30am.
In actual fact, a stupid bird woke me at 4am, half an hour before my alarm was due to go off.  Even then we ended up rushing around and barely making the race briefing, leaving only enough time for me to fill my water bottles before the start, and not enough time to fit in a pre-race wee.

SDW100

The 6am start of the race was like any other.  I don’t think it ever really hit me that I was on the start line for a 100 mile race, which is insane when I type it now.  I said to a friend the other week that I don’t have a gauge for what is ‘normal’ anymore.  I’m so used to talking about ultramarathon events with other runners.  When I come to talk to non-runners about races it’s hard to judge whether or not the distances I talk about seem realistic or not!

The start of the SDW100 sees the competitors run around the outskirts of the Sports Ground field with a tight spot about halfway round and then another gridlock as runners all file out of the field through a narrow opening and onto the footpath that leads the race alongside farmers’ fields.  I jogged round this first field with another runner from our club, Mike.  Mike is a fantastic runner, incredibly modest despite looking at a potential sub 20 hour time that day.  As we hit the footpath we wished each other luck and off Mike sped into the distance.

SDW100

I was concerned about having to wear glasses on the event, – I can never see quite so well as with contacts – but I knew wearing contacts for so long would damage my eyes and make them very sore, especially as I got tired as the race went on, so glasses it was.

The checkpoints are superbly stocked on the Centurion events.  So much so, that all I had packed food-wise in my bag was a couple of nakd bars and some gels.  Neither of which I fancied so early on into my race.  Despite that I managed to push a warm nakd bar down about 5 miles in.  I also stopped to call Laura and update her on my pace.  I was lucky enough to have three volunteer crew members with me for the event.  Laura came down with me, was planning to crew through the day and then help pace me from mile 70 that evening.  Guy and Alan (who was my first running coach) were both going to meet me at mile 22 and then subsequent crew points throughout the race.  I didn’t think I would really need or use a crew, but I have to admit it was lovely to break the race up into the distances between crew points, knowing that I would see my supporters at the next spot once more and they came to my assistance on several occasions when I craved fruit I didn’t have, brought me bottles of chocolate milk and undid the top of my Vaseline pot when I couldn’t!

Anyway, I had produced a little chart showing the times I would arrive at each crewpoint if I ran a 25/26/27/28/29/30 hour race.  (The cut-off time for the finish is 30 hours.)  Both sets of my crew appreciated my little chart and agreed it would be helpful to follow along the times to roughly predict when to arrive at each point to see me.  However, by the 6 mile point when I rang Laura I was much closer to a sub 23 hour pace.  I wasn’t too concerned about running too fast at this point, as I was taking plenty of walk breaks and could still easily maintain a very chatty conversation with other runners as they came past/I ran past them.  However, I was concerned that my crew wouldn’t arrive in time to see me at the first crew point at mile 22!  I knew I would need suncream and chocolate milk by then but didn’t want to hang around!

Crew point times for the SDW100

The first checkpoint was just before 10 miles and I made sure to top up with water and nuun, grabbing some cheese sandwiches and watermelon before continuing on my way.  Many had stopped here for longer than I intended to.  There was another 90 miles to go and I wanted to get going!

At mile 11 we ran down through a long field with cows in.  I’m pretty certain that one of the guys ahead of me slid through a very large cowpat here.  I just spotted him in the distance on the floor and there was a massive skidmark when I reached that point.  I did wonder briefly if he had realised that a spare set of clothes might come in handy for more than just a change when he felt sweaty!

Not long after this I bumped into a guy who I then went on to run several miles with.  I’ve said it before but I absolutely love meeting and chatting to other ultra runners during events.  It always makes the miles pass quicker when you can chat about your previous running experiences and hopes for the race.  It was his first 100 mile race too and he went on to run it in a great time.

Luckily, despite arriving at the first crewpoint (and second checkpoint) after just 4 hours and 47 minutes my crew had already arrived and had suncream and chocolate milk out and waiting for me.  The earliest I had told them I would arrive was 11:39am – nearly an hour later than I did!

SDW100

The first 22 miles was such easy running though – it included nothing like the hills that I knew were to come in the second half of the race.

SDW100

I didn’t stop for long at the first crew point, just taking on what I knew I needed and heading off again.  I’d run past the toilet, but couldn’t be bothered to go back for it, sure that there would be more loos out on the course as I went along.

SDW100

Mile 35 was the next point I would meet up with my crew and again, and there were some lovely runnable sections along this part.  I came in to meet my crew after 8h 15m, still a long way off the chart I had produced.  Sorry about that guys!

SDW100

More suncream, some vaseline on my back where my bag had begun to rub, some chocolate milk and a quick sit down in the deckchair before heading onto the aid station further up the track.  I  learnt here that Mike had taken a bad fall on the downhill just before reaching the crewpoint and really smashed his face up.  He had sat for an hour with the ambulance crew before deciding to continue on, although Kev rang me a few minutes after I left this checkpoint to tell me that Mike had also done some damage to his ribs so had decided to pull from the event.  It was such a shame as he had been running so well.  I was really gutted for him.

At mile 45 I was following a guy wearing a SDW100 t-shirt from 2017 who turned and asked me which way to turn when we reached a crossroads.  I pointed out that wearing a t-shirt from the previous year really meant that he was much more qualified to hazard a guess!  We decided to follow a track over a stubble field which luckily brought us down a steep hill where we could see markers in the distance again.  He told me that I was still well on for a sub 24 hour race (which really wasn’t my target at all) to which I replied that I doubted that very much, but he pointed out that I should reach mile 50 before 12 hours was up and I was surprised to see that he was right.  I knew that I wouldn’t tick off a sub 24 hour race though.  I’d run faster in the first half than I knew I would be able to achieve in the second, knowing the hills in that half of the course which were still to come.  In my head before race day I had seen 30 hours as a very achievable time, thinking I would potentially come in somewhere around 28 hours, although factoring everything into an event as long as 100 miles is something that’s incredibly difficult to do, so I knew that I could be very off with my calculations.  Basically, I only ever want to run one 100 mile event (at least whilst Oscar is young) and I just wanted to make sure I got to the finish line on the day.  Kev had given me confidence earlier in the week when he had announced that my 50 mile time from the SDW50 in April had been faster than any of his previous 50 mile times over that terrain and his best 100 mile time was 25h 12m (also at the SDW100 in 2015).

SDW100

It was 47 miles before I met with my crew again.  This time it was just past a station.  I really needed to see my crew here.  The heat was beginning to get to me.  I was losing my hearing in one ear a little – a sign I usually find is due to lack of electrolyte intake.  I sat down for quite a while – very unlike me, but I felt that it was needed.  There wasn’t an aid station here, and I really craved some fruit, so Guy found me some in his car.  I hope I didn’t steal his lunch!  Another runner from our club, Helen, had met the crew for Mike/James here after catching a train over that day.  She had intended on pacing Mike for the final 50 miles of the race, although this was now obviously no longer the plan.  Instead she was now going to step in with James for some miles instead.  Whilst she waited for Kev to collect her, she sat talking to a guy on the side of the road who was in the middle of trying to work out whether taxi or train would be the best way of getting home as he had decided to call it a day at his 100 mile attempt.  He had removed his socks and shoes – definitely done for the race, but by the end of their conversation he had put these back on again and was seen heading off up the road to carry on!  We later saw him running around the track at the finish!

The halfway point was a big milestone for me.  The halfway point fell at 54 miles (I realise that’s over halfway!) and I knew that I would soon begin recognising the route from this point, as the second half of the event is run over the route of the South Downs Way 50, an event I had completed earlier in the year.

As I arrived to check in at Washington Village Hall I spotted Ally heading up the track who came rushing over to say Hi.  I’ve followed Ally for a while on social media and met her for the first time at the start of the SDW50 earlier in the year.  It was lovely to see another friendly face and she told me that Lauren was still inside, and also struggling with the heat, as so many others also had been that day.

I knew I needed to lay down once I got inside.  Sitting still is really not my thing and I knew I would feel weak if not moving but still sitting upright.  I really craved some hot food – anything but picnic food by this point and was glad to smell the hot tomato pasta on offer at the far end of the hall.  One of my crew went to get me a bowl, I can’t remember who – whilst I lay on the floor had a quick catch up with Lauren.  I struggled to eat much of the pasta.  By this point I had eaten so much fruit and so many cheese sandwiches that I was fed up of all food and nothing really appealed.  It was a real struggle to get the few forkfuls that I did down, but I knew I would appreciate them later on.

I finally got to use an actual toilet at this checkpoint which was much appreciated although navigating removal of my bag and layers to get to the toilet to begin with was a bit of a mission.  After my trip to the loo it was time to go again.  I have no idea how long I spent at this checkpoint.  I think somewhere in the region of 30 minutes or so, but I very much needed the time out, so it was time well spent.  I arrived at 7:41pm according to the official results, although in my head it felt so much earlier than that, despite the now dusky sky as I left.

Botolphs was the next checkpoint at mile 62.  “That’s 100k you’ve run!” exclaimed the marshals as I arrived alongside a couple of other guys.  In some ways that statement was satisfying, but the other guys I had arrived with were both pulling out here and once again I needed to sit for a while.  I had begun having a few heart palpitations and was feeling much more short of breath by this point.  I half thought in my head I might need to pull from the race, and everyone around me deciding the same only backed up my decision for me.  I had almost succumbed to doing the same when I decided to phone Kev for a chat.  I knew he would help me decide either way what would be best to do.

Turns out he was only 10k up the road waiting for James to come through.  Helen was currently running with James, but trading places as pacer with Amanda at the point where Kev was at.  Chatting to Kev was just what I needed and he offered to drive down to meet me so that Amanda could run the next section of the course with me.  I told him that I was not planning on putting him or anyone else out and that he wasn’t to do that at all.  He told me that of course I wouldn’t be putting him out.  That he was there to help whoever on the day, having initially been planning to crew for Mike who had dropped out hours earlier.  I told him that I thought I needed to pull and that would be it.  He understood although was disappointed for me.  I hung up, and told the marshal that I probably also intended to pull at this point.  The marshal asked if there was anything I would like to eat.  Having not fancied anything when I arrived, I now craved orange segments and sandwiches, and he obliged, grabbing me a handful of each.  Another runner arrived at the checkpoint, also planning to pull.  The deckchairs were full of runners now, all waiting for a lift to the finish.

62 miles.  100k.  Would I really be happy if I only ran 62 miles?  No, I decided that I wouldn’t.  I’d run further than that before.  I had come out to run 100 miles that day and even if I didn’t make it to the finish line I was definitely planning on making it past the 70 mile mark which I’d already run twice in the past.  All in a rush I stood up, announced I was going on, took the second handful of orange segments and cheese sandwiches that were thrust in my direction and jogged off into the night over the road on a high!  I rang Kev when I reached the other side of the road announcing that I was continuing, hearing whoops in the background from both Kev and Amanda who was hurriedly changing into her running clothes to run back and meet me.  I was back in the race again.  I was going to do this!

…And then I remembered the massive hill that follows the checkpoint at Botolphs.  Ugh!  It was bad enough 11 miles into the 50 mile event in the boiling sun, but 63 miles into a 100 mile event in the pitch black of night?…I made it up somehow.

I still felt pretty perky, constantly checking flashlights in the distance to see if I could spot Amanda heading back towards me.  Three miles along and a bouncy headtorch light bobbed speedily in my direction.  It was too speedy for someone to be dropping out but it didn’t match Amanda’s usual style either.  A rather jolly Helen yelled out a greeting and filled me in.  She and James had arrived at the next crewpoint a little early so Amanda had headed off as initially planned with James for the remainder of his race.  Helen had decided to run back to find and help me.  Having never run with Helen before other than in large club trail groups I was initially rather nervous about keeping up/having conversation, etc.  But she was fantastic.  She moved at my pace with no prompting, no pushing, just what I needed.

My watch had died just before Helen arrived which was rather frustrating.  I knew it probably would die at some point but had expected it to get to at least 70 miles before beeping it’s final beep.

Chatting to Helen I began to pick up mentally again.  My walking had never become slow but my running had been non-existent for a little while.  But now, I was running sections again and my walk was at a much faster pace.  Helen had been talking about when I completed the race and each time I had corrected her with ‘if I completed’, but I had stopped doing that now, thinking really positively once more.  She commented on how quickly I was still moving forward despite being in the middle of a ‘mental down’ section of the race.

We arrived at Saddlescombe Farm (67 miles) and a lady gave me a nice warm cup of tea.  I don’t usually drink tea but this one was so good I requested a second.  Helen also grabbed me a handful of the vegan peanut butter fudge which was on offer.  Amazing!  We stopped for maybe 5 minutes at the most and one of the marshals pressed a lolly into my hand as we left for the rest of our journey.

At mile 70 I could hear Kev in the distance and it wasn’t long before I saw Alan, Guy and Laura also.  Helen quickly filled them in on my last five miles whilst Laura prepared to run the next section with me.  Everyone else wished me luck and then we were off.  It was maybe only a couple of miles before I started having more palpitations again.  I was feeling weak by now and hadn’t eaten anything really substantial in a while.  Something I need to work on at my next attempt.  The light in my headtorch had gone and I knew I needed to swap headtorches, as I was carrying a spare in my bag but couldn’t co-ordinate myself to get one out and then I needed more batteries.  All effort at this point.

My palpitations were getting more and more regular now and I decided to have a little lay down on the side of the track.  It felt good.  I was exhausted.  Laying down felt so, so good right then.  After a few minutes on the floor I got up and with renewed energy ran a bit faster for a little while before I needed another lie down around the 76 mile point.  Here I actually fell asleep for 5 minutes or so until Laura pointed out that there was a moth buzzing around my headtorch lamp which kept batting me in the face without my noticing.

I knew I needed to pull from the race at the next checkpoint and told Laura so.  I felt strangely relieved that I had come to the decision despite it not really being what I wanted.  I knew I had made the right decision to continue at mile 62, but by mile 78 I was done.  The long hill down towards the checkpoint where I pulled; Housedean Farm felt like it went on forever and I was so grateful to see that there was a spare deckchair out for me to perch on when I arrived.  I was told I needed to hand my number in, but I wanted to keep it so just removed it and placed it in my bag.

Official stats when I pulled:

Finishing time: 22:22:50
Position: 235
Gender position: 40
Category position: 13

There were 223 finishers in total, with 82 drop-outs on the course.

Upon removing my number I fell asleep.  Waking only to transfer into Guy’s car as he arrived to collect me a little later.  He then drove to the next checkpoint at 84 miles (must have slept through that journey too) where I got into Laura’s car, received hugs from Kev and Helen and then I must have promptly fallen asleep once more, waking a couple of hours later in a boiling hot car parked at the finish point in Eastbourne.  Laura was still asleep on the back seat but it was insanely hot in the car and so I pulled myself out and lay down on the path alongside the car under a foil blanket.  I had intended on having a little more sleep but several runners’ families came over to check I was OK, and it wasn’t long before Nici from Centurion came over to check on me and to move me along.

I actually felt better after a walk and thought that I could probably stomach a sausage in a roll and hot chocolate by that point so made my way to a bench by the BBQ where I had a good view of the finishers running around the track.  With all that sleep deprivation I did have to stop myself tearing up a couple of times as I saw runners moving along the final 400 metres.  I had messaged Laura to let her know that I was watching others finish and so she soon joined us and Kev also arrived, along with James’ girlfriend and then Helen ran in.  Despite no longer having anyone to pace she had decided to run the remainder of the course, no doubt prompting lots of swear words as she bounded past those struggling to finish the 100 miles!   We set up chairs alongside the track to wait for James to come in, who finished just minutes behind Lauren a little after 29 hours.

We headed for home not long after that.  Laura had managed to grab chunks of sleep between checkpoints and a long section of sleep when parked up at the finish, so she was good to drive home again and I arranged for Dan to pick me up from Laura’s house in Northampton on our return.

Initially I had hoped to stay awake until 6pm or so that evening, before having a super long sleep that night and hopefully getting back fairly quickly into a normal routine.  However, I was not prepared for quite how exhausted I was.  It was minutes before I fell asleep in the car on the way back.  Every so often I would wake, buzzing with a story to tell Laura about the race.  I would finish my story and then fall straight back asleep again, barely awake enough to listen to Laura’s responses.

Other than the lack of sleep though I felt surprisingly fine.  My legs would have been good to go for a run the following day I think – although I didn’t test this thought out and took a full week to recover.  More about that in another post though.  This has been my longest post yet!

I’ll just finish with the lovely medal that Dan made and Oscar coloured in for me and brought when they came to collect me.

100 Supermum medal

A pacer for 35 miles and a life update

This might be a bit of a shorter race recap to my usual double posts(!) but I want to finally get something down on the blog about the Shires and Spires 35 mile race from the 20th May (six weeks ago!) before I forget all the details of the day.

The last few months have been absolutely insane when it comes to work and sleep and at times I have felt like I’m just existing and getting through the days, rather than actually living them.  Picking up 15 schools to mark coursework for an exam board and working extra night shifts unfortunately both fell at the same time that Oscar dropped his two hour daytime naps and began to kick up a fuss about going to bed.  This meant that some of his bed times dragged on for more than three hours before he was asleep and I could finally head downstairs to tidy up after the day before heading out for a nightshift/collapsing into bed myself.

We had it so easy for so long that it made it feel all the more difficult.  I wrote about Oscar’s eighteen month routine here – he used to be fast asleep by 7:45pm back then and it already seems like a lifetime ago, not just the three months that it actually is!  We’ve switched him out of his cot into a toddler bed now and this seems to have helped somewhat thankfully.

I’ve also handed my notice in at Tesco to finish at the end of the current rota (three more weeks), which is a relief (in some ways, but also a worry over the lack of guaranteed regular money coming in).  But it will allow for more family time, more me time, more running time, more relaxation time, less stress and upset and other opportunities to provide an income.  All in all, I know it’s for the best, but that extra guaranteed £1000 a month is going to be hard to do without until we settle into a new routine.

Tesco was never going to be forever though.  When Mum was very sick last year Oscar and I drove the 200 mile round trip to visit 3-4 days each week.  This is obviously something I do not regret, but our savings took a massive hit and after Mum died and I began visiting less I had to take action to try and replenish our savings again, which I have now been able to do.

Anyway, enough of the life update, more of the running…I’ve run a parkrun, 35 mile race and ran 78 miles of my first 100 mile attempt since I last blogged, so I’m hoping to have a bit of a catch-up blogging day today before my brain becomes mush and I forget all the details from the past six weeks!

The Shires & Spires 35 mile race fell the day before I returned to work following my maternity leave last year and so I never got a chance to write a proper recap of the race and still regret that now.

I love the Shires and Spires event.  35 miles of Northamptonshire countryside with lots of rolling hills and beautiful scenery.  It’s a Go Beyond event and with the start just a few miles from my running club base, checkpoints are often well stocked with W&DAC runners so it’s lovely to see so many friendly faces not only out running the event on the day, but also manning the checkpoints on route.

Shires and Spires was my first ultramarathon in 2013 and I have run it every year since apart from 2016 when I was 6 months pregnant with Oscar.  (2014 * 2015 recaps) With this being my fifth year running the event, and having run numerous training runs out on the course I know the route better than I know the back of my hand.  With my goal race (South Downs Way 100) just three weeks later, I knew I didn’t want to run Shires hard this year, and so instead offered to pace anyone who would like to complete the 35 miles in about 8 hours, as this was a time I knew I should easily be able to achieve without pushing myself too hard on the day.

One person took me up on my offer.  Somebody who regularly walks long distance events (of 100+ miles!) but who until recently has not really been doing a huge amount of running.  She had run the event the previous year with a group of runners who had just intended on getting round within the 9 hour cut-off, but knew she was capable of completing the race in a faster time than this, although not yet confident enough to navigate the race on her own.

It was a hot day (it seems like we haven’t had anything else for the last few months now!) and so I thoroughly applied a thick layer of suncream before setting off for Lamport Hall.  Although, in typical Mary fashion I rocked up just ten minutes before the pre-race briefing having still to pack my bag, collect my number and having to forfeit my pre-race trip to the loo!  After dropping my t-shirt from registration back at the car I even had to jog back to the start line in order to make it on time for the starting horn!  I was fairly relaxed with no pressure on this race – knowing the course so well and without any time expectations for the day.  Probably a little too relaxed in the morning to be honest!

The first few miles of Shires are all trail and easy running.  The first checkpoint falling about 4.5 miles in to the race.  This year for the first time alongside gels and cake, Go Beyond were also offering fruit and the cold watermelon slices went down incredibly well at each of the checkpoints in the heat of the day.

I took some nuun tablets with me.  I tend to have one bottle with just water and one with electrolytes when I run an ultra and so popped a tablet into the bottle on my right at the first checkpoint and off we ran again.  100 metres or so along the road I heard what I thought was someone making ‘shhhhh’ noises right behind me, so spun round to see nothing, only for the pressure inside my water bottle from the still-fizzing nuun tab to become too much and for liquid to shoot out of the top all over Vikki!  Haha!  It definitely made us jump!Shires and Spires 35m

The next checkpoint at 9 miles came round just as quickly and we were soon heading off on our way again.  There is a long section of road in the middle of the Shires course, and although the road is good going it is still super hilly.  I was told Northamptonshire was flat when I moved here!

Truth be told I expected Vikki to break into power-walk quite often.  She comes from a long-distance walking background and so I know she can cover the ground when she walks.  Turns out though, she can also cover the ground when she runs, and I am sure she would have quite happily have run much more of the course if it wasn’t for me walking the hills and through checkpoints, etc as per my usual game plan.

Shires and Spires 35mThe heat began to get to me after the third checkpoint and although I was still going strong I then needed to include more walk breaks in the open sections than I would have done had it been an overcast day.  We were moving at a pace much faster than the 8 hours I had intended to run which I knew I needed to rein back in anyway.

Salted up after Shires and SpiresI was replacing the salts I lost with the food I was eating and my nuun tabs but it always concerns me when I lose so much.  This is a photo of my shorts at the end of the event!Shires and Spires 35mMy legs were beginning to turn red, despite the coating of suncream I’d applied that morning and so I nicked suncream from a friend at the final checkpoint before we began the last long uphill slog to the finish and the final 10k.

By mile 31 I could tell that Vikki was capable of running much faster and more than I wanted to at that point and so I encouraged her to go ahead.  It had been a long while since we weren’t surrounded by other runners and I quickly reminded her of the directions to the finish, reassuring her that she would probably pass plenty of other runners along the way so never be far from others.  Her main concern for the day had been navigational issues.

Shires and Spires 35m

(My official finish photo from Adrian Howes)Shires and Spires 35m

Four miles later and I found myself running through the finish funnel.  Go Beyond had an announcer for the finish who was doing a fantastic job of announcing runners as they crossed the line.  Many club runners were still stood on the sidelines cheering us in, along with many others from our club who had just come to cheer at the end.  Always a lovely touch.
Shires and Spires 35m cheering Lorraine through the finish

(Photo by Adrian Howes)

I made sure to join our club members on the sidelines to see everyone else through the finish line.

Vikki rushed over to tell me that she had come in as third V45 female, so even received a trophy for her run, which was fantastic news to finish to!

Shires and Spires 35m timeI can’t believe how close my Garmin read to the 35 miles!

Official time: 7:47:47
Position: 131/164
Gender position: 28/41
Age category position: 14/17

It actually ended up being my second best Shires time, despite pulling myself back a fair bit, chatting to lots of people and not racing the event.  I’m sure I’ll be back in 2019 to see what I’m actually capable of!  😉Shires and Spires 35m medalThe medal was another lovely one detailing the route of the course through the Northamptonshire villages…Shires and Spires 35m medal on Oscar…although it was soon stolen by my child on returning home!At the end of Shires and Spires with Dan and OscarI managed to sit and chill with Dan and Oscar for a little while before heading up for a shower and pre-work hour-long nap.  Unfortunately I couldn’t book the night off, so still headed off to work that evening for a 10pm-7am night shift following running the 35 miles in the day.  All good training for the 100 mile event, right?!

Do you salt up when running in the sun?
Have you ever paced someone during a race before?
How early do you like to turn up before the start of a race?