My goals for 2019

So it’s that time of year when I try and look back over what I had hoped to achieve during the previous year and set myself some aims and goals for the year ahead.
I’ll start by reviewing the goals I had for 2018:

Volunteer at least six times at parkrun including in the role of pacer

Not quite.  This year I’ve volunteered in the role of pacer (30 minutes), barcode scanner, pre-event setup and post-event close down, so I’ve only managed to volunteer four of the six times I had hoped to volunteer during 2018.  (Parkrun suggest that volunteering three times a year is a good target to aim for.)  Although I haven’t met this target, I’m happy that I managed to volunteer four times.  Early in the year, getting to parkrun at all was rather difficult, as I was working through the night until 7am on a Saturday morning each week.  Now volunteering has become more challenging as I often have Oscar with me, but there are still plenty of roles I can help out in and intend to during 2019.  (See 2019 goals further down the page.)

Run Mummy Run takeover at Kettering parkrun

Complete at least six more distances of marathon and above

Done.  I actually didn’t think I had achieved this goal until I sat down and worked it all out the other night though.  But I ran the South Downs Way 50m in April, the Milton Keynes Marathon and Shires and Spires 35m back in May, Robin Hood 100m in September, Dusk ’til Dawn Marathon in October and then Gower Marathon in November.  My marathon total is now 16, and I’ve also run a further 11 ultras in distances up to 100 miles.  That’s 27 events on the list…I’ll soon be heading towards 100 Marathon Club entry…

Milton Keynes Marathon medal 2018

Complete a 100 mile race

I was so, so happy to have completed the Robin Hood 100 in the Autumn!  It meant so much for me to cross that finish line and I will forever be in debt to all the people who helped me get to the start and finish of the race that day.

Robin Hood 100 medal and t-shirt

PB at 5k, half and marathon distances

Fail, fail and mighty fail!  Haha!  2019 was definitely not the year of the PB (unlike 2015!)  My fastest 5k time in 2018 was 27:06 (compared to my PB set in 2017 of 26:35), I walked the majority of Milton Keynes Half in March following an injury (finishing in 2:50:42, when my PB from 2012 is 2:09:16) and the only road marathon I ran during the year was in 28 degree heat.  When I found myself dodging nothing but walkers out on the course by mile 11, I decided to just enjoy the race instead, making the most of the race atmosphere and finishing in 5:32:01, a long way short of the 4:54:08 PB I set for myself back at the end of 2015.

MK Marathon finish in the stadium with a giant rhino costume

Put aside £500 from side hussles each month towards the deposit for a second property

This has been a big success surprisingly.  Without including my standard wage from my supermarket job,-I’ve still managed to bring in a minimum of £500 each month on top of that, whilst still Mumming full time.  I’ve picked up a bit of social media work for a few companies, a couple of design jobs, the odd bit of overtime from my supermarket job, a monthly paper round, some work marking coursework for an exam board, filled in a number of quizzes on Prolific, sold some unused items in our house and have recently started my journey into matched betting.

Rather than go on a deposit for a second property the money has actually all been put aside to pay for our garage to be converted into a playroom for Oscar.  Work begins on the conversion this coming Monday and I can’t wait to be able to give Oscar a space of his own for his toys and games.  So, although the money hasn’t been put aside for a house deposit, it has been used wisely (I hope!), will add value to our house (we already have enough drive space for two cars, and who uses garages nowadays anyway?!).  Working hard to ensure I hit this target each month has shown me that I can side hussle enough money away on a regular basis to make a difference whilst still living reasonably comfortably.

I’ve had a few people ask me about Prolific just lately.  It’s a survey site used by academics.  You fill out a large number of screening questions when you first sign up for an account but then are only sent surveys you are able to answer and won’t be screened out of which is great.  When Oscar is in nursery on a Friday, I spend most of the day catching up with freelance work in our home office on the computer and have Prolific open in a tab in the background.  Most of the surveys are only a few minutes long so if one pops up whilst I’m working I usually switch tabs and complete it.  Fridays are the only day I get on the computer now really since having Oscar, but I have still managed to cash out several hundred pounds over the last year which has definitely helped with household bills!  If you are interested and would like to sign up and give it a go, please use my Prolific referral link(I will get a small reward from Prolific when you cash out for the first time for sending you in their direction.)

Respond to/clear notifications on my phone quickly

I’m so much better at this than I used to be!  I did have notifications set on my phone for lots of rubbish that I never really ever got time to check.  I had a big cull a few months back where I stopped notifications every time certain people tweeted or posted on Instagram and that made a big difference.  I find I really have to be in the mood to be actively engaged on Twitter and I was just letting the notifications all build up at the top of my screen until I had time to go through them, which was never!  Now that I’m not forever clicking through notifications I have a bit more genuine time for Twitter which is nice, as it does tend to be my preferred social media platform.

Eat less processed food and encourage my Dad to do the same

I’ve cut back a bit, although not yet as much as I would like, but more importantly my Dad has made a massive overhaul to his diet.  For somebody who wouldn’t think twice about eating several chocolates a day, (living near to a chocolate factory he was always stocking up on reduced chocolates!) he no longer buys in bags of chocolate for the house.  He has also stopped having rich foods in the evenings and doesn’t eat after a certain time each evening as he realised that his choice of food and drink was affecting his sleep and the way that he felt.  I am very proud of him.  He’s had such a hard year; losing my Mum, his dog, four cousins and going from living in a large bungalow with three adults and a dog to just him, having to learn simple but vital tasks like online banking, writing and sending out Christmas cards (on time!) and keeping on top of the cleaning.  All the jobs that my Mum used to take care of around the house.  He’s definitely picked himself back up and is taking more control again now which is good.

Move at least 10,000 steps each day

I was definitely on target for this.  It gave me a real motivation to get up and moving every day, even on the days I really didn’t feel like it.  Unfortunately my Garmin Vivofit died in the middle of November though and I don’t have the spare money to replace it right now.  Although I didn’t hit 10,000 steps every day, I managed several streaks of 50+ days across the year and easily maintained an average of 12,265 daily steps for 2018 despite the 6 missing weeks of data at the end of the year.  I’m hoping perhaps next year I can justify spending on another fitness tracker, but for now, my arm is fitness tracker free.
I know I’m hitting a minimum of 10,000 steps a day at the moment anyway.  I work overnight into Monday mornings, and I have always covered more than 10,000 steps during a shift.  I then run the remaining six days of the week, with no run (other than my Saturday parkrun) shorter than 6 miles in distance.

Garmin Vivofit steps

Raise money for a cancer charity

I’m only really releasing details of my fundraising plans this week, so the bulk of my fundraising money will be collected during 2019.

Ronnie Staton, Race Director of HoboPace has incredibly generously offered to come and put on a talk for me to help raise funds for Cancer Research on the evening of the 29th March in Wellingborough.  He intends to tell tales of extreme running adventures that he has encountered as a coach and as an athlete himself.  Although this event has been arranged for a while now, I haven’t announced it until this point as Ronnie sadly suffered a stroke shortly before Christmas.  His recovery has been going well though, and he has insisted he still wants to help make my fundraising evening happen.  I am so thankful for the time he intends to put in towards making this work.  I am just waiting for a couple of details to be confirmed on the tickets and then I will advertise tickets on the blog for anybody who would be interested in coming along.

Goals for 2019:

My Pro Planner

Become more confident talking to successful people

I once met Mimi Anderson (at a Write this Run event back in 2013?!)  I sat in the corner of the room quietly whilst other runners posed for selfies with her.  On meeting Will Mellor at a University club night I awkwardly just said “Can I have a photo?” when he tried to start up a conversation with me.  I’ve met quite a few famous people over the years.  (I had lunch with Katy Hill as a teenager and once sat and chatted to Frankie Dettori for a good twenty minutes. – I didn’t know who he was until afterwards, but that’s a whole other story!)

I want to become more confident with talking to people I view as successful.  I find myself mumbling and without anything interesting to say, when I know that chances of a lifetime are slipping away!  This coming weekend I’m heading to The Running Show as an ambassador for the event.  I will be having photos taken alongside the other ambassadors and speakers on both days.  Having my photo taken alongside such inspiring people as Paula Radcliffe, Jo Pavey and Nell McAndrew, – heroes of mine.  I want to challenge myself to step outside of my comfort zone, ask for selfies, chat to those people and learn as much as I can from the experience.  With my VIP entry I also have access to the VIP room and the VIP meet and greet area.  I am so looking forward to the experience and really hope I can come out of my shell enough in order to make the most of the weekend.

Me with Will Mellor at Zanzibar in Stafford(Picture from 2008 – there’s a blast from the past!)

Run a sub 4h 30m marathon

This WILL happen.  It’s my main focus for the year.  At the moment I’m putting everything into my London marathon training.  No shiny ultras are going to distract me along the way this time!

Raise £3000+ for Cancer Research

Too many members of my family have died from cancer during the last 18 months.  It scares me to think that without research even more family members could go down the same horrible route as my Mum.  It scares me to think that Oscar’s family could slip away from him all due to the horrible illness.  I want to be a part in helping to raise money for research to a cure and prevention.

Volunteer at parkrun at least six times, including in a new volunteer role

At the back of my mind I still really want to get a parkrun set up in our area, closer to home.  I’ve had a couple of knock backs from local parks this past year but one day I’ll get there and I’ll be able to set something up I’m sure.  When that day comes I’d like to have enough experience in the different roles to be able to assess what is required at the new event.  I love the whole parkrun concept, and have known so many non-runners find the running bug after starting their running lives at the free 5k parkrun on a Saturday morning.

Declutter our house

This is a big thing for me.

My Dad is a hoarder.  Not the kind you see on Channel four shows where the occupants of a house can barely make their way to the chair in the corner of the room and the bed hasn’t been seen for weeks.  But, he’s always been a bit of a wheeler-dealer.  He’s brought ‘bargains’ back from auctionhouses with the intention of selling them on for profit, and rarely throws anything away, just in case it comes in useful one day.  His large five bed bungalow is very much full, and when my Nan (his Mum) died back in 2003 he built a large cabin-type shed in the garden to store her belongings.  It still contains china and furniture and hundreds of photographs which he has put off sorting through.

I take after my Dad.  An eye for a bargain and a hoarder of nostalgia.  I have boxes of items of belongings that are only meaningful to me.
Having grown up sharing a room with his brother, when I first met Dan he had very few personal belongings.  You could fit them all into one very small box.  He has a few more now, but still nothing in comparison to the items I have in our house.

This past year though, since my Mum died and since having Oscar I feel as though I’m finally ready to start letting go of some of those belongings.  I would much rather be spending quality time with my family than digging through boxes of paperwork to find a guarantee for something I never got round to filing, or having to spend time tidying away and cleaning under piles of things I don’t pick up for years at a time.

I’ve bought very few things into the house during 2018, as we have made huge cut-backs in order that I can remain a full time Mum to Oscar.  It has done wonders for the clutter and staying at home has also given me a chance to begin clearing out and organising the space we do have.  It also helps that I’ve become addicted to shows like Tidying Up and Consumed on Netflix since the start of the year!  I want to spend my time with people, not things.  This year I really want to clear out a good 30% of our items and become more minimalist about our belongings.  My Dad has also asked me on a number of occasions now if I will help clear his house, so it will be a good year for us both I hope.

Continue blogging each week and retain blogging friendships

This is probably the hardest item on the list.  To find a spare three hours or so to write a meaningful blog post each week is a really tough ask when I already cram so much else into my week, but I hate it when I don’t get time to write about a race, or leave it so long to write up my recap that I’ve forgotten half of the details.  I love the blogging life – it’s become a real outlet for me over the past few years.  I’ve gone from hiding away, hoping nobody I knew found out about my little corner on the internet, to sharing my blog address with runners from my running club and letting real life friends follow my AHM Instagram account.  I’ve been invited to some fantastic events over the years and met some lovely people through blogging that I’m proud to call friends now.  I hate that I don’t have the time to put into blogging and reading the blogs of friends that I once had, but hope to put more of a focus on this again during 2019.

How many hours do you spend writing blog posts?
Are you a hoarder?

Ever met anybody famous?  Do you go all shy or ask for a picture?

Hanson’s Marathon Method plans

I have a charity place in the London Marathon next year. (I’m running for Cancer Research UK)

The fundraising target I have set for myself is to raise £3000+ by the time I run London on the 28th April.  The charity asked for a minimum pledge of £2000 but I hope to raise more.  I will post details on the blog as I have them in the New Year, but the two main events I will be holding are:

1) An evening presentation led by a race director.
2) A pub quiz based entirely around running questions.

I’m really looking forward to finalising arrangements and for these fundraisers to unfold.

I read a BBC news article online the other evening entitled Fraudulent charity runners condemned.  I was horrified to read that ‘following a BBC investigation, 1278 people who accepted places paid for by charities in 2017 were recorded as raising nothing.’  It goes on to mention that in regards to the 2017 Great North Run ‘The highest proportion [of people raising no money] was reported by Cancer Research UK which also had the largest number of runners.  Of the 758 people who took its charity places, 318 (42%) raised nothing.’

That’s awful, really.  I know that I have been asked to raise a minimum of £2000 in order to run London next year.  If each of those 758 runners raised even half that amount, £758,000 would make such a huge difference for the charity.  The article goes on to say that although some runners just simply do not show for race day, often a large number of runners still go on to complete the event.

Not only do I want to raise at least £3000 as part of my fundraising, but I want to train for a time that I will personally feel proud of achieving.

I want to aim for at least a sub 4:30 marathon.

This would mean taking more than 20 minutes off from my current marathon PB (4:54 – achieved at Chelmsford marathon in 2015, pre-Oscar).

Chelmsford marathon 2015I have never completed a full training cycle successfully.  I always get sidetracked by interesting ultras, or trail marathons or long runs with friends along the way.  This time though, I am determined to remain on task and focused, with no other races booked in until at least May 2019!  (Although I have two cross country races within the next couple of weeks, but both under 6miles in distance).  I even successfully resisted entering the Country to Capital 45m and the brand new Rose of the Shires 50m ultra in April – agreeing instead, to marshal at both events.

I’ve read a lot about the Hanson’s Marathon Method over the past few years and noticed the difference to my times and endurance as I began to adopt some of the key principles of the plan into my training week.

Hansons Marathon Method bookI had particular success following the tempo sessions.  They allowed me to have belief in my ability to run continuously at a tempo pace over longer distances.

The speedwork sessions were also so useful, as I am unable to attend speedwork sessions on a running club night (Dan doesn’t return home from work in time for me to get there) and I never really know how to structure the sessions myself.

Running 5-6 days a week does really work for me and I definitely notice the gains to be had from more frequent running.  Having organised set workouts on a plan encourages me to get out and run on those days.

My main concern with the plan that my rest day has to fall on a Monday.  (I work through the night on a Sunday until 6am Monday morning.  I then only get a maximum of an hour of sleep before Dan leaves for work and I have Oscar on my own until Dan returns at 9pm.  By that point I’m absolutely exhausted having had just one hour of sleep from the previous night and it would be an impossible ask to head out for a run on Dan’s return.)  This then means that I can’t really be very flexible if something crops up later in the week where I would normally be able to swap my rest day around.

I’ve written out the plan in full as written in the book, but there will be tweaks on the days I run.  Mainly Monday and Wednesday runs will be swapped (as mentioned above) and Friday and Sunday runs (as Sunday has become our family day at home and I work Sunday evenings).

Hanson's Marathon Method plan

So, first run on the plan starts tomorrow (although the first week is filled with easy runs)…wish me luck!

Which training plans do you use for your marathons?
How many times per week do you prefer to run?

The London Marathon ballot reveal

This week the ballot results for the 2019 Virgin Money London Marathon (VMLM) have been announced.  Unlucky ballot entrants receive either a rejection magazine…

London Marathon rejection magazine 2018(Here’s mine from last year)

…or a rejection email.  (Becoming more and more likely with the higher numbers of hopeful people applying for a place each year.)

Personally, I received my eighth marathon rejection earlier today, which wasn’t too much of a shock.  Apparently 414,168 people applied for the ballot this year.  The race only has approximately 35,000ish finishers, and that includes elites, championship/GFA entries and those running for charity.  That’s a whole lot of people that are going to end up disappointed this week!

Whilst I know so, so many people will have been disappointed over the past couple of days when they received their rejection message, it is rather frustrating to see many turn to social media to complain about the ballot being an unfair system.

In fact, surely the opposite is true?

Everybody that enters for a place in the London Marathon through the public ballot has an equal shot at being selected for one of the places on offer.

Yeah it might be rather sucky that this is your ninth rejection (No more than nine rejections are possible!), but it’s also probably pretty sucky that you haven’t won the lottery in the past nine years either!

If you don’t win the lottery but are still desperate to become a millionaire, then there is the option to go out and work hard to make it happen.  The same applies when it comes to wanting to run the London Marathon.  If you are desperate to run the event, there are other ways to gain a place.

Applying for a charity place

London Marathon is known for the hoards of charity runners who line the street on race day.  In fact, the official VMLM website states that accounting for everything that was fundraised using their online Virgin Money Giving system for the 2018 race, £24,593,020.00 has been raised to date!
Often, charity places open for applications not long after the main ballot opens.  Some of the more well known charities will not be able to guarantee you a place though and will be asking questions such as how much money you are hoping to raise for them and reasons why you want to run for their charity.  If you are not too choosy about the charity you want to run for though, you will usually still be able to secure a charity marathon place a couple of months out from race day.
Charities tend to ask that you raise a minimum of £1500, with most asking for £2000 or more.  Although this can sound like a lot of money, the charity themselves has to fork out £300 for your entry and as long as you begin fundraising early on and don’t leave it all to the last minute raising the money is probably more of an achievable target than you initially thought.  In fact, if by now, you already know that you are running for a charity, you still have a good couple of months before the main bulk of marathon training needs to begin and you should be able to hopefully put most of your focus into fundraising, and then later on into the training, rather than having to try and juggle everything all at once in the weeks leading up to race day.

Good For Age (GFA)/Championship qualified

The Good For Age requirements have changed from the 2019 race, which you can read about in my blog post here.  If you have run a time deemed as ‘good’ for your age at a previous marathon event as listed by the team at VMLM then you will be offered a place in the race the following year.  Although this used to be a guaranteed way to gain entry to the marathon, this is no longer the case.  There are now a maximum of 3,000 female GFA spots and 3,000 male GFA spots available for the 2019 event.  If more than 6,000 runners applied for a GFA position, then ‘the qualifying time will be reduced evenly across the age group categories listed above until 3,000 runners of that gender are accepted’.  Meaning that you may have worked super hard to achieve a 3:44 qualifying marathon time as a senior female runner, only for the goalposts to be moved after you have submitted your entry, due to high numbers of other runners also applying for a place and you may not actually end up with a race place at all.
It’s too late to enter the 2019 event using this method as places needed to be applied for at the start of the Summer, but it could be something to work towards ready for the 2020 race.  For many people though, it may be necessary to put a lot more time, hard work and dedication into their training in order to achieve the stated times.

Club places

All England Athletic clubs offer a number of VMLM places to their members (dependent upon the size of the club.  The majority of clubs then host their own ballot to determine who runs to represent their club at the marathon the following April.  Clubs may have their own prerequisites when it comes to entering.  For example, to enter the VMLM club ballot for one of two places as held by my running club you have to provide your rejection email/magazine from the main ballot.  You can then gain further entries into the club ballot if you marshaled the club race that Summer or ran a certain number of club-targeted races throughout the year.  I have only run the London marathon once before, in 2014 and this was the way in which I gained my place.

Competitions

This option requires the least work but the most luck!  There are always lots of competitions offering marathon places in the weeks and months following the ballot results.  Keep an eye on the official London Marathon social media accounts and also any of their official sponsors, as they often post about last minute marathon places up for grabs!

VLM marathon number collection

It hasn’t been very nice to read some nasty comments today on social media about runners who ‘shouldn’t get a place’ as they’ve already run the race or ‘aren’t fast enough to be classed as a runner’.  I’ve seen lots of comments about people criticising current non-runners for entering the ballot and then gaining a place, even though once upon a time they themselves would have been non-runners and potentially in the same situation.  Everybody who enters the ballot knows how incredibly slim the chances of getting a place are.  Don’t make others scared to announce their good fortune because of your jealousy!

London Marathon is what it is.  It’s an incredibly iconic and well supported event, but it’s not a fast course due to the sheer volume of runners out there and it can actually be rather stressful feeling so boxed in along many areas of the course.  I’ve run the race before and I did really enjoy it, but there are so many fantastic other marathons to try out as well!

I wanted to raise money for Cancer Research this year following the death of my Mum , Aunts, Godmother and cousins of my Dad.  We’ve had a lot of cancer related death in our family since the end of last November and I want to help work towards preventing cancer in the future, albeit in a very small way through raising much needed funds.  I applied for a London Marathon place through Cancer Research several months ago now and after initially hearing that I hadn’t been successful, I received an email a fortnight ago offering me a place.

I’m really excited to say that I will be running at London in 2019 and more importantly, raising money for a cause that means a lot to me and my family right now.  I’m really looking forward to being part of the Cancer Research team on the day and in the build up to the day.  There are a couple of large events which I have in mind to hopefully make up the bulk of my fundraising.  (I’m hoping to raise a minimum of £3000) and I’ll share them on the blog when I have more details.

Good luck to all runners preparing for the 2019 event, first timers and 6-time-lucky-ballot-enterers alike!

Do you have a place for London 2019?  Did you enter the ballot this year?
Have you run the race before?
Any successful fundraising suggestions you can share with me?

Changing tactics for attempt number 2

I recapped my South Downs Way 100 mile attempt in my last post.  Frustratingly I didn’t complete the distance but I have already entered another 100 mile race in order to have another shot at it.  I will complete 100 miles!

Interestingly I posted a poll on Twitter at the end of last week.  Results below:

So I’m not alone in not completing 100 miles the first time round.

I recently read a quote from Cat Simpson on the Centurion Running website where she spoke about having the confidence to run the Grand Union Canal Race after knowing her body could continue moving past the length of a day, having completed her first 100 mile event in 25 hours.  (She has since gone on to complete 100 milers in a mere 17 hours.  Insane!)

A couple of points:

1 – I can only ever dream of running that fast

2 – I never want to run the GUCR!

3 – Whilst on the Centurion website just now I spotted Robbie Britton’s 100 mile winning time of 15h 47m at the SDW in 2013.  The pro ultra runners don’t have to deal with sleep deprivation at all!

I have bit the bullet and entered the Robin Hood 100 mile race in September.  (64 days away.)  It has very similar rules to SDW in terms of pacing/crew, the same time limit (30 hours) and is a much flatter course on more runnable terrain.  Dan and I have friends living nearby who have agreed to put Dan and Oscar up for the weekend so that they can come out to support me.  (Although I do fear for their two rabbits who Oscar is currently obsessed with.  Not sure the pair of them could put up with a very excitable toddler in love with ‘hop hop bunnies’ for a whole weekend!)
There will be live tracking at the event and I’ll share the link closer to race day.

I also have an amazing team of friends who have offered their services to pace and crew for the day.  I really would not be able to even think about completing this kind of distance without the help I have been offered and it really means so much to me that friends have such high faith in my abilities.  I promise to do my best not to let anyone down.

It would be silly for me to have run 78 miles of the South Downs Way, decide to pull from the event and then rock up to the next one having not taken anything away from the day, so below I’ve tried to pull everything I could from my first experience and commented realistically as to if it worked or if I could have improved things in that area.

Sleep:

This has to come first on my list because I feel like it was my biggest downfall in the build up to the race.  So often sleep or diet are the forgotten ingredients when training and this has very much been the case with me this year.  My sleep has been shocking and I genuinely do not know how I have existed most weeks.  In the build up to race day I was working three night shifts a week – 10pm-7am, followed by one hour of sleep before acting as sole parent in charge of an active and needy toddler the following day.  The only exception to this has been on Sundays when I would usually manage three hours of sleep followed by shared parental responsibility for the day.  Some evenings I would also manage to cram an extra hour of sleep in before my night shift began and towards the end I discovered that I could also fit in a 35 minute nap in the back of my car during my 1am ‘lunchbreak’ on a shift.  But it’s been far from ideal.
Going forward I have since handed my notice in at my night shift job (although have also now retracted it to work just one night a week when Dan and I weighed up the benefits.  One night a week should hopefully be sustainable going forward whilst also providing us some extra money to add to our savings pot.

The night before my first attempt at the distance I had planned on getting a solid 7-8 hours of sleep, but a late meal out and early bird call resulted in not getting to bed until 11am and waking by 4am the day of the race.  Again, far from ideal.

Food:

I didn’t take enough food with me in my bag for the start of the race so, other than a nakd bar after a couple of miles, and a couple of grabbed sandwiches at the 10 mile checkpoint I had no other food with me until I met with my crew at mile 22.  I need to sit down and properly study the crewpoints for the next race and work out how much food I need to be taking on board between each checkpoint and ensure my bag always remains topped up.

When I first started working nightshifts I struggled with my appetite and eating.  Most of the other people I work with have a cooked meal during our lunchbreak (1am).  I decided against this as I love breakfast too much, and I like Oscar to have somebody to eat his lunch and dinner with each day, rather than have him eat on his own when he is still so young.  However, it would often result in me grabbing a large bar of chocolate/slice of cake midshift to perk me up and get me through when I was feeling exhausted.  I realised that I wasn’t doing myself any favours and having toyed with the idea for a while I switched to a more vegetarian/vegan lifestyle which is suiting me much better.  I’ll write more about my choices and decisions in another post at some point, but basically I’m not strictly vegan, I never choose meat dishes and have substituted a lot of dairy products with alternatives in recent months.  I don’t like the idea of consuming so much processed food.  If I wouldn’t be happy with Oscar consuming it, then I shouldn’t be either.  I’m much happier with my results since the change and have discovered so many great alternative meals as a result.

However, on race day, I knew that chocolate milk works for me and so kept this in as part of my plan.

Chocolate milk and an apple

Pacing:

I actually think that I paced SDW fairly well.  The going was much easier in the first half than I knew it would be in the second half, and in terms of when to run/walk, this is very much dictated for you with the hills and rough terrain.  I think I will have more problems when it comes to pacing when it comes to the Robin Hood event as it is a much, much flatter course.  I think I may need to stick to some kind of regular run/walk method in order to prevent running too hard too early on in the race.  When I ran the Grim 70m a few years ago I tried to stick to running no faster than 12 minute miles and no walking slower than 15 minute miles and that worked well for me, but it was a very different event – 10 mile loops.  The Robin Hood is three loops.  Two of 30 miles and one of 40 miles.

Darkness:

I have no concerns about running in the dark as I’ve always run trail through the night during the Winter months and so this wasn’t an issue on the SDW.  However, there were only 7 hours and 31 minutes of darkness in June compared to the 11 hours and 11 minutes I will have in September.  Although again, this could help prevent me from travelling too fast during the later miles and burning out before the end.

Core:

I worked religiously on my core at the start of the year but as life took over it was something that I neglected.  However, my core was still fairly strong due to the manual nature of my part time job.  Lugging full supermarket cages around a massive store is not for the faint-hearted and for several weeks I was placed on the juice aisle – one of the heaviest sets of cages of all and often working 8-10 cages in a night.  I ensure I walk a minimum of 10,000 steps each day, including a daily walk with Oscar, who I carry when he gets too tired.  We weighed him the other week and he’s two stone now!  I vividly remember my arms aching from carrying him at just a few weeks old when he was less than 7lbs!

Dan, Oscar and I(When Dan carries him, he takes the easy option of carrying him on his shoulders!)

Training:

I ran around 50ish miles a week in the months leading up to SDW100, although often didn’t record all of my treadmill runs on Strava.  I’m planning to run all of my runs outside in the build up to Robin Hood so as to remain accountable and analyse my pace/training a little better.  I took a full week off from training after SDW, and had a couple of easy training weeks before jumping back in with training again but I’m hoping to get back on it again now.  I’ve been out running with others a fair bit over the last couple of weeks and that always makes me feel more enthusiastic about getting out there for extra miles.
I have to be very organised with when I’m planning on running as I have Oscar at home all week.  I have to get up at 5:15am or run late at night around bedtime/Dan’s work or other activities.  I’ll be honest, on the days when I was super exhausted and struggled to get out of bed in the morning I did roll over and go back to sleep.  It’s something I rarely do as I’m such a morning person, but with so little opportunity to sleep this year I’ve really had to grab any chance I could get.  I need to ensure I slot any missed miles back in later in the day/week though as I want to ensure I give myself the absolute best chance of making it round on race day.
I didn’t complete as many speedwork sessions as I would have liked this year, and feel that I could increase my speed further, therefore completing the race sooner and helping to prevent tiredness setting in too early into the race.

My weakness will definitely be my tiredness on race day.  I thought that I would sail through on no sleep with all the experience I have of sleepless nights, but even though my work is very manual it is NOT the same as covering 100 miles on no sleep at all.

What are your stumbling blocks when it comes to training?
Do you analyse events after you have run them?